innate

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in·nate

 (ĭ-nāt′, ĭn′āt′)
adj.
1.
a. Existing naturally or by heredity rather than being learned through experience: "Chimpanzees show an innate distrust of contact with strangers" (Cindy Engel).
b. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong.
2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent: "As the Army and farmers built more and more levees, the Missouri lost an innate capacity to absorb its frequent excesses" (William Least Heat-Moon).

[Middle English innat, from Latin innātus, past participle of innāscī, to be born in : in-, in; see in-2 + nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

in·nate′ly adv.
in·nate′ness n.

innate

(ɪˈneɪt; ˈɪneɪt)
adj
1. existing in a person or animal from birth; congenital; inborn
2. being an essential part of the character of a person or thing
3. instinctive; not learned: innate capacities.
4. (Botany) botany (of anthers) joined to the filament by the base only
5. (Philosophy) (in rationalist philosophy) (of ideas) present in the mind before any experience and knowable by pure reason
[C15: from Latin, from innascī to be born in, from nascī to be born]
inˈnately adv
inˈnateness n

in•nate

(ɪˈneɪt, ˈɪn eɪt)

adj.
1. existing in one from birth; inborn; native: innate talents.
2. inherent in the character of something: an innate defect in the hypothesis.
3. arising from the intellect or the constitution of the mind, rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of good and evil.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin innātus inborn, past participle of innāsci to be born, arise =in- in-2 + nāsci to be born]
in•nate′ly, adv.
in•nate′ness, n.
syn: innate, inborn, congenital, hereditary describe qualities, characteristics, or possessions acquired before or at the time of birth. innate, of Latin origin, and inborn, a native English word, share the literal basic sense “existing at the time of birth,” and they are interchangeable in most contexts: innate (or inborn) stodginess, strength, abilities. congenital refers most often to characteristics acquired during fetal development, esp. defects or undesirable conditions: a congenital deformity; congenital blindness. hereditary describes qualities or things passed on from ancestors, either through the genes or by social or legal means: Hemophilia is a hereditary condition; a hereditary title.

innate

, inherent - The word innate means "inborn" and should apply to living things; inherent is "essential, intrinsic" and applies best to nonliving things like ideas.
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.innate - not established by conditioning or learninginnate - not established by conditioning or learning; "an unconditioned reflex"
2.innate - being talented through inherited qualities; "a natural leader"; "a born musician"; "an innate talent"
intelligent - having the capacity for thought and reason especially to a high degree; "is there intelligent life in the universe?"; "an intelligent question"
3.innate - present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development
nonheritable, noninheritable - not inheritable

innate

innate

adjective
1. Possessed at birth:
2. Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
począćwrodzony

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] ADJinnato

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adj [feeling, sense, ability, talent, understanding] → inné(e)
She has an innate sense of fairness → Elle a un sens inné de l'équité.

innate

adjangeboren; man’s innate desire for happinessdas dem Menschen angeborene Verlangen nach Glück

innate

[ɪˈneɪt] adjinnato/a

in·nate

a. innato-a, inherente.
References in periodicals archive ?
The difficulty for school leaders in challenging circumstances is to ensure a positive psychology permeates the school community where all adults believe that all children can succeed, regardless of perceptions about innate intelligence or economic background.
Perhaps it is not the same as increasing innate intelligence, but helping young people hit their intellectual potential is critically valuable - and apparently not so difficult to do.
If kids are told that they aced a test because of their innate intelligence, thatcreates a "fixed" mindset.
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I recognise the innate intelligence and energy of some of the children at the youth group and I have no doubt in my - however unqualified - mind that they could be successful all the way through to higher education.
What if she had not had the innate intelligence to succeed at Harvard Law?
The retreat itinerary starts off the week with a two-day workshop that explores the scientific research behind the heart's energetic field of innate intelligence, the Chakra Centers and what Ms.
Science The findings, published in the journal , indicate that an urgent need - making rent, getting money for food - tugs at the attention so much that it can reduce the brainpower of anyone who experiences it, regardless of innate intelligence or personality.
This is, in fact, the same type of innate intelligence that allows a cat to give birth to a litter of kittens.
The innate intelligence of Nola's breed makes her an excellent candidate for learning new things but adds a dimension to the human-dog relationship that some may find challenging: Nola needs to exercise her brain more than most dogs.
Jack's innate intelligence is slow to assert itself, however.
Washington, June 1 ( ANI ): A severed section of the spinal cord can make a comeback when its own innate intelligence and regenerative capacity, termed as the "spinal brain" is awakened, a new study has claimed.