innovation

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in·no·va·tion

 (ĭn′ə-vā′shən)
n.
1. The act of introducing something new.
2. Something newly introduced.

in′no·va′tion·al adj.

innovation

(ˌɪnəˈveɪʃən)
n
1. something newly introduced, such as a new method or device
2. the act of innovating
ˌinnoˈvational adj
ˌinnoˈvationist n

in•no•va•tion

(ˌɪn əˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something new or different introduced.
2. the act of innovating; introduction of new things or methods.
[1540–50; < Late Latin]
in`no•va′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innovation - a creation (a new device or process) resulting from study and experimentationinnovation - a creation (a new device or process) resulting from study and experimentation
creation - an artifact that has been brought into existence by someone
2.innovation - the creation of something in the mindinnovation - the creation of something in the mind
creative thinking, creativeness, creativity - the ability to create
concoction - the invention of a scheme or story to suit some purpose; "his testimony was a concoction"; "she has no peer in the concoction of mystery stories"
contrivance - the faculty of contriving; inventive skill; "his skillful contrivance of answers to every problem"
3.innovation - the act of starting something for the first timeinnovation - the act of starting something for the first time; introducing something new; "she looked forward to her initiation as an adult"; "the foundation of a new scientific society"
commencement, start, beginning - the act of starting something; "he was responsible for the beginning of negotiations"
authorship, paternity - the act of initiating a new idea or theory or writing; "the authorship of the theory is disputed"

innovation

noun
1. change, revolution, departure, introduction, variation, transformation, upheaval, alteration technological innovations of the industrial age
2. newness, novelty, originality, freshness, modernism, modernization, uniqueness We must promote originality and encourage innovation.

innovation

noun
A new and unusual thing:
Translations
إِبْتِكَارٌإبْتِكار، تَجْديد
inovacezměna
fornyelseopfindelse
innovaatio
inovacija
újítás
nÿjung, nÿbreytni
革新
혁신
naujovėnovatorius
jaunievedumsjauninājums
innovation
นวัตกรรม
sự đổi mới

innovation

[ˌɪnəʊˈveɪʃən] N (= act) → innovación f; (= thing) → innovación f, novedad f

innovation

[ˌɪnəˈveɪʃən] n
(= new method, invention) → innovation f
the technological innovations of the industrial age → les innovations technologiques de l'âge industriel
(= inventiveness) → innovation f
We must encourage innovation → Nous devons encourager l'innovation.

innovation

nInnovation f; (= introduction also)Neueinführung f (→ of +gen); (= thing introduced also)Neuerung f

innovation

[ˌɪnəʊˈveɪʃn] ninnovazione f

innovation

(inəˈveiʃən) noun
(the act of making) a change or a new arrangement etc. The new system in the school canteen was a welcome innovation.
ˈinnovator noun

innovation

إِبْتِكَارٌ inovace opfindelse Innovation καινοτομία innovación innovaatio innovation inovacija innovazione 革新 혁신 innovatie oppfinnelse innowacja inovação нововведение innovation นวัตกรรม yenilik sự đổi mới 创新
References in classic literature ?
It were good, therefore, that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself; which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly, by degrees scarce to be perceived.
It seems also more advantageous for the state, that the husbandmen should have their wives and children in common than the military, for there will be less affection [1262b] among them in that case than when otherwise; for such persons ought to be under subjection, that they may obey the laws, and not seek after innovations.
Alexander I- the pacifier of Europe, the man who from his early years had striven only for his people's welfare, the originator of the liberal innovations in his fatherland- now that he seemed to possess the utmost power and therefore to have the possibility of bringing about the welfare of his peoples- at the time when Napoleon in exile was drawing up childish and mendacious plans of how he would have made mankind happy had he retained power- Alexander I, having fulfilled his mission and feeling the hand of God upon him, suddenly recognizes the insignificance of that supposed power, turns away from it, and gives it into the hands of contemptible men whom he despises, saying only:
How many conquests did the Romans and others make in the characters of allies, and what innovations did they under the same character introduce into the governments of those whom they pretended to protect.
A few evenings later Pete entered with fascinating innovations in his apparel.
Notwithstanding this difficulty, the priests, who interested themselves much in this revolt, ran with the utmost earnestness from church to church, levelling their sermons against the Emperor and the Catholic religion; and that they might have the better success in putting a stop to all ecclesiastical innovations, they came to a resolution of putting all the missionaries to the sword; and that the viceroy might have no room to hope for a pardon, they obliged him to give the first wound to him that should fall into his hands.
To this manly spirit, posterity will be indebted for the possession, and the world for the example, of the numerous innovations displayed on the American theatre, in favor of private rights and public happiness.
A month or two found even the Dodecagons infected with the innovation.
Here Nature herself appeared to erect a barrier, and to plead against extending the innovation to these two classes.
The constitution of the summer-house had lasted until the spring of the year eighteen hundred and sixty-eight, when the unhallowed footsteps of innovation passed that way; and the venerable privileges of the Owls were assailed, for the first time, from the world outside.
The innovation, if not wrong as an innovation, will be wrong as an expense.
Then to sum up: This is the point to which, above all, the attention of our rulers should be directed,--that music and gymnastic be preserved in their original form, and no innovation made.

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