Inns of Court


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Related to Inns of Court: Inner Temple

Inns of Court

 (ĭnz)
pl.n.
1. The four legal societies in England founded about the beginning of the 1300s and having the exclusive right to confer the title of barrister on law students.
2. The buildings housing the Inns of Court.

Inns of Court

pl n
(Law) (in England) the four private unincorporated societies in London that function as a law school and have the exclusive privilege of calling candidates to the English bar. See Lincoln's Inn, Inner Temple, Middle Temple, Gray's Inn

Inns′ of Court′


n.
1. the four legal societies in England that have the exclusive privilege of calling candidates to the bar.
2. the buildings occupied by these societies.
References in classic literature ?
He was never seen on 'Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the "City"; no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln's Inn, or Gray's Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen's Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts.
At the Lord President's in Piccadilly, at Lambeth Palace, at the Lord Chancellor's in Great Ormond Street, in the Royal Exchange, the Bank, the Guildhall, the Inns of Court, the Courts of Law, and every chamber fronting the streets near Westminster Hall and the Houses of Parliament, parties of soldiers were posted before daylight.
School-children acted, University students acted, the learned lawyers or Inns of Court acted, great lords and ladies acted, and even at times the King and Queen themselves took part.
With this brief introduction, she produced from her pocket an advertisement, carefully cut out of a newspaper, setting forth that in Buckingham Street in the Adelphi there was to be let furnished, with a view of the river, a singularly desirable, and compact set of chambers, forming a genteel residence for a young gentleman, a member of one of the Inns of Court, or otherwise, with immediate possession.
I - I've heard of other cases about these Inns of Court.
James Haddow, came from a drowsy den in the Inns of Court, full of leather and parchment, for the law was his profession and history only his hobby; he was indeed, among other things, the solicitor and agent of the Prior's Park estate.
Neighbors, always invited to Prior's Park on such occasions, went back to their own houses in motors or on foot; the legal and archeoological gentleman had returned to the Inns of Court by a late train, to get a paper called for during his consultation with his client; and most of the other guests were drifting and lingering at various stages on their way up to bed.
The rising solicitor was struck off the roll, at his own request--and entered himself as a student at one of the Inns of Court.
The American Inns of Court Professionalism Awards are awarded in participating federal circuits, to a lawyer or judge whose life and practice display sterling character, unquestioned integrity, and dedication to the highest standards of the legal profession and the rule of law.
Of the two universities, Oxford more than Cambridge shared the Inns of Court emulation of royalty.
The Mission of The American Inns of Court is to foster excellence in professionalism, ethics, civility, and legal skills.
The award gives the American Inns of Court an opportunity to reach out to Inn members and nonmembers alike who share the organization's vision of legal service as a distinguished profession.