Innu


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In·nu

 (ĭn′o͞o)
n. pl. Innu also In·nus
A member of an Algonquian people comprising the Montagnais and Naskapi.

[Montagnais and Naskapi, people.]

Innu

(ˈɪnuː)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of an Algonquian people living in Labrador and northern Quebec
2. (Languages) the Algonquian language of this people
References in periodicals archive ?
The Innu of Labrador, Saguenay and from Cote-Nord have never ratified a treaty which could have driven them to give up their own territory to Canada.
The proposed development has divided the Innu Nation along the lines of who is prioritizing jobs and who is prioritizing resource protection, according to Todd Russell, president of the 6,000 member Labrador Metis Nation.
With the temperature at -40, he found six Innu teens in an unheated shed.
The Innu First Nation of Uashat Mak Mani-Utenam wishes to remind potential purchasers of Rio Tinto's share of Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOC) that the Canadian Aboriginal group continues to fiercely oppose IOC's mining, railway and port operations within their traditional territory.
In December 2010, LIM signed an Agreement in Principle ("AIP") with the Innu Takuaikan Uashat Mak Mani-Utenam (Sept-Iles), which stipulates the principal terms to be included in an IBA.
ANGLESEY Mining's Canadian joint venture Labrador Iron Mines Holdings has signed an agreement with the indigenous Innu nation.
Armand MacKenzie of the Innu Nation of eastern Canada, said today, 'In Canada, I hope that the words "highest attainable standards of health" mean more than sending body bags to Indigenous First Nations communities.
I dreamed the animals; Kaneuketat; the life of an Innu hunter.
Personal highlight: A visit with Elizabeth Penashue, Innu elder, river-lover, and diarist.
The award in the environmental and natural resources category will go to Elizabeth (Tshaukuesh) Penashue, from Kanekuanikat, Labrador, who has spent decades fighting to protect her Innu homeland and the traditional lifestyle of her people.
The award in the environmental and natural resources category will go to Elizabeth Penashue, from Kanekuanikat, Labrador, who has spent decades fighting to protect the Innu homeland and traditional lifestyle.
The Innu are Naskapi-Montagnais Indians, or, politically correctly, First Nations, who, I'm sure don't appreciate being called Inuit by mistake.