inquisitorial

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in·quis·i·to·ri·al

 (ĭn-kwĭz′ĭ-tôr′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or having the function of an inquisitor.
2. Law Relating to a legal proceeding in which the judge is both actively involved in determining the facts and in deciding the outcome.
3. Extremely inquisitive or prying: "a sharp inquisitorial gaze" (Michael Chabon).

in·quis′i·to′ri·al·ly adv.

inquisitorial

(ɪnˌkwɪzɪˈtɔːrɪəl)
adj
1. of, relating to, or resembling inquisition or an inquisitor
2. offensively curious; prying
3. (Law) law denoting criminal procedure in which one party is both prosecutor and judge, or in which the trial is held in secret. Compare accusatorial2
inˌquisiˈtorially adv
inˌquisiˈtorialness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inquisitorial - especially indicating a form of prosecution in which proceedings are secret and the accused is questioned by a prosecutor who acts also as the judge
accusatorial - specifically indicating a form of prosecution in which one is publicly accused of and tried for a crime and in which the judge is not also the prosecutor
2.inquisitorial - marked by inquisitive interest; especially suggestive of an ecclesiastical inquisitor; "the press was inquisitorial to the point of antagonism"; "a practical police force with true inquisitorial talents"- Waldo Frank
inquiring - given to inquiry; "an inquiring mind"
3.inquisitorial - having the authority to conduct official investigations; "the inquisitorial power of the Senate"
inquiring - given to inquiry; "an inquiring mind"

inquisitorial

adjective
Unduly interested in the affairs of others:
Informal: nosy, snoopy.
Translations

inquisitorial

[ɪnˌkwɪzɪˈtɔːrɪəl] ADJinquisitorial
an inquisitorial system of justiceun sistema judicial inquisitorial

inquisitorial

[ɪnˌkwɪzɪˈtɔːriəl] adjinquisiteur/trice, inquisitorial(e) (literary)

inquisitorial

adjinquisitorisch; after an inquisitorial meeting with the headmasternachdem ihn der Rektor streng verhört hatte or ins Verhör genommen hatte

inquisitorial

[ɪnˌkwɪzɪˈtɔːrɪəl] adjinquisitorio/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In France's inquisitorial system, by contrast, the investigating judge may consider outside interests such as victims, animals, minority groups, or the environment and even permit those parties or their representatives to participate in the proceedings.
specific question of this Article--whether the inquisitorial system or
Kennedy favours an inquisitorial system like in France, without prosecuting and defence counsel and the high drama they seek which sometimes obscure the truth.
2) Joining English critics of this change in the law, O'Reilly, an American lawyer, argues that this amendment of English criminal procedure does the following: (1) it reverses a long history in English jurisprudence guaranteeing an accused person's right to silence in the face of a criminal accusation, (2) it degrades the presumption of innocence, the foundation principle of Anglo-American accusatorial criminal law, (3) it moves that accusatorial system of justice toward an inquisitorial system, (4) it does not achieve its desired objectives of increasing confessions and admissions during police investigations, the likelihood of obtaining convictions, and the consequent reduction of crime.
Among the reasons for these backlogs is the still incomplete move from an inquisitorial system to an accusatorial system at the national level, and the lack of specialized alternative mechanisms, such as drug courts and diversion programs.
It emerged in England early in the 18th century as an alternative to the Roman-canon inquisitorial system in which the judge was charged with inquiring into the circumstances of the case is order to uncover the truth, itself a 13th-century alternative to trial by ordeal.
This is especially so given the recent calls for practitioners in common law jurisdictions to embrace 'moral activism' and the more judicially interventionist approach of the inquisitorial system.
Similarly, we have rejected an inquisitorial system of legal fact finding in favor of an adversarial system largely because we fear the power of the centralized state to skew the truth.
5: The right to habeas corpus and trial by jury will disappear as we absorb Euroland's inquisitorial system under corpus juris;
294) would prevent the inquisitorial system from trampling the rights of defendants in a politically volatile case, but it is hard to imagine a system featuring vigorous confrontation and diligent adverse counsel that would not conflict with the judge-centered model that Uviller defends.
22) Others have denigrated the right to silence as a "relic of the Star Chamber" which is no longer relevant in today's criminal justice system and have advocated limiting the right, and adopting the inquisitorial system of justice in the United States.
A practicing lawyer for 39 years, Kubicek here attacks the American adversarial system of criminal justice as a system that allows too many of the guilty to escape unpunished and urges the adoption of an inquisitorial system in which all parties are enjoined to seek the truth, thus eliminating what he sees as the contradiction between attorney's duties to serve as a zealous advocate and their duties as officers of the court.