ice age

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ice age

n.
1. A cold period marked by extensive glaciation.
2. Ice Age The most recent glacial period, which occurred during the Pleistocene Epoch.

ice age

n
(Geological Science) another name for glacial period

ice′ age`


n.
1. (often caps.) the geologically recent Pleistocene Epoch, during which much of the Northern Hemisphere was covered by great ice sheets.
2. any one of the Permian, Carboniferous, Cambrian, or Precambrian glaciations.
[1870–75]

ice age

1. Any of several cold periods during which glaciers covered much of the Earth.
2. Ice Age The most recent glacial period, which occurred during the Pleistocene Epoch and ended about 10,000 years ago. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, great sheets of ice up to two miles thick covered most of Greenland, Canada, and the northern United States as well as northern Europe and Russia.

Ice Age

1. A period during which glaciers advanced to cover large parts of the earth’s surface, the most recent occurring over 11,000 years ago.
2. A time when ice sheets covered much of the Earth. The present Ice Age is only one of several ice ages.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ice Age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surfaceice age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surface; "the most recent ice age was during the Pleistocene"
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"
prehistoric culture, prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
Translations
العَصْر الجَليدي
doba ledová
istid
jääaeg
jääkausi
jégkorszak
ísöld
doba ľadová
ledena doba
buzul çağı

Ice Age

n the Ice Agel'era glaciale

ice

(ais) noun
1. frozen water. The pond is covered with ice.
2. an ice-cream. chocolate ice-cream. Three ices, please.
3. (American) a fruit-flavoured frozen dessert usually made without milk and cream. lemon ice(s).
verb
to cover with icing. She iced the cake.
ˈicing noun
a mixture of sugar, white of egg, water etc used to cover or decorate cakes.
ˈicy adjective
1. very cold. icy winds.
2. covered with ice. icy roads.
3. unfriendly. an icy tone of voice.
ˈicily adverb
ˈiciness noun
ice age
a time when a great part of the earth's surface was covered with ice.
ice axe
a type of axe used by mountain climbers to cut holds in ice for their hands and feet.
ˈiceberg noun
a huge mass of ice floating in the sea.
ice box
(American) a refrigerator.
ˌice-ˈcream noun
cream or a mixture of creamy substances, flavoured and frozen. chocolate ice-cream.
ˈice-cube noun
a small cube of ice used for cooling drinks etc.
ice rink
a large room or building with a floor of ice for skating.
ice-skate verb
to skate on ice.
ice-skating noun
ice tray
a metal or plastic tray for making ice-cubes in a refrigerator.
ice over/up
to become covered with ice. The pond iced over during the night; The windows have iced up.
References in periodicals archive ?
com/the-last-time-earth-was-this-hot-hippos-lived-in-britain-thats-130-000-years-ago-53398) Eemian interglacial period some 115,000 years ago.
So, rather than call for arbitrary limits on carbon dioxide emissions, perhaps the best thing the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the climatology community in general, could do is to spend their efforts on determining the optimal range of carbon dioxide needed to extend the current interglacial period indefinitely.
During the most recent interglacial period, with less C02 in the air, sea level crested at thirty feet above today's level.
For example, BSP for the Alps shows population growth in recent past, probably concordant with the current interglacial period.
A collapse of the ice sheet during an interglacial period would expose such a seaway.
Much of climate change is entirely consonant with natural climatic cycles in an interglacial period.
We are currently experiencing an interglacial period, referred to as the Holocene, that began some 11,000 years ago, at the end of what is known colloquially as the Ice Age.
Their findings reveal that dung beetles were much more frequent in the previous interglacial period (from 132,000 to 110,000 years ago) compared with the early Holocene (the present interglacial period, before agriculture, from 10,000 to 5,000 years ago).
This is the last interglacial period, when the North Atlantic was warmer, fresher and sea level was higher than it is today and looked a lot like what climate models predict it will look by the end of this century.
The oak has been recorded in British history since the interglacial period around 300,000 years ago.
The current interglacial period has seen the most drastic changes in our forests, but not because the climate shifts were so different from previous episodes.
These stopped about 18,000 years ago as earth's climate suddenly snapped into what is pretty, much like the current interglacial period.