interlacustrine


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interlacustrine

(ˌɪntələˈkʌstraɪn)
adj
situated between lakes
References in periodicals archive ?
Amongst an endless list of Mafeje's projects, his book titled 'The Theory and Ethnography of Afrikan Social Formations: The Case of Interlacustrine Kingdoms' (which he wrote in 1986 but only published in 1991) provides lessons, regarded as informative for this exercise.
1960: 'Feudalism among the interlacustrine kingdoms' in Audrey I.
53) It is further important to note that in this period Nguni and Sotho-Tswana migrations to southern Africa occurred at around AD 1100 and 1300 respectively, probably from a nucleus in the interlacustrine region of Africa (Figure 1).
The first stage includes intrusive precursors, such as the arrival of Islam, Christian missionaries, new trade routes, and changing rivalries in interlacustrine Africa.
With a comparative analysis of the descriptions of military might in the Ethiopian-Eritrean highlands and interlacustrine East Africa, Reid explores state-level conflict in local terms.
As first, second or third language speakers (most Africans are multilingual), more than 85% of Africans speak one of 15 core languages: as well as Swahili, we find Nguni, Soth-Tswana, Amharic, Fulful, Mandenkan, Igbo, Hausa, Yoruba, Luo, Eastern Inter-lacustrine and Western Interlacustrine (Kitara), Somali-Samburu-Rendille, Oromo-Borana and Gur.
Specifically with regard to the interlacustrine region that includes Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, West of Tanzania and East of Congo, he drew the following conclusion:
The thirty papers are organized into seven groups: after the introductory section on general issues and approaches (six papers), there is a section on methodological studies of crops and animals (six), and then the five sets of regional case studies: the South-East (four); the Zambezi basin and its peripheries (two); East Africa, interior and coast (five); the interlacustrine region (four); and the equatorial rainforest (three).
The Theory and Ethnography of African Social Formations: The Case of Interlacustrine Kingdoms.
Central Africa is represented by chapters on the area between the coast and the great lakes, the interlacustrine region and the basins of the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers.
Various other king lists had earlier been recorded by European explorers and missionaries, and the corpus was then added to by clan histories and by corresponding compilations for several of the many other kingdoms in the East African interlacustrine region ('Lakeland' as it is termed here).