intrapreneur

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in·tra·pre·neur

 (ĭn′trə-prə-nûr′)
n.
A person within a large corporation who takes direct responsibility for turning an idea into a profitable finished product through assertive risk taking and innovation.

[Blend of intra- and entrepreneur.]

in′tra·pre·neur′i·al adj.

intrapreneur

(ˌɪntrəprəˈnɜː)
n
(Commerce) a person who while remaining within a larger organization uses entrepreneurial skills to develop a new product or line of business as a subsidiary of the organization
[C20: from intra- + (entre)preneur]

in•tra•pre•neur

(ˌɪn trə prəˈnɜr, -ˈnʊər, -ˈnyʊər)

n.
an employee of a corporation allowed to exercise some independent entrepreneurial initiative.
[1975–80; intra- + (entre)preneur]
in`tra•pre•neur′i•al, adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the past year alone, the agency has launched UpStartU, a course that sends its entrepreneurial employees to study intrapreneurship at the NYU School of Professional Studies (NYUSPS); Dunes of Dreams, the agency's invention development program that invites employees to submit their best ideas for the opportunity to turn their concepts into a reality; and a philanthropic trip to Peru with Cross-Cultural Solutions.
The program is designed for Saudi-based companies, nonprofits and government organizations to develop novel processes, design thinking and intrapreneurship to benefit their corporate missions and support the development of a knowledge economy in Saudi Arabia.
This is great news to all those interested in entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship.
We're beginning to see public intrapreneurship, such as in the local government innovation labs that are springing up all over the place.
Over the past few years, the WSIE has acted as the stage for launching several life-altering initiatives, according to Hamdan, who cites the global water innovation exchange and a corporate intrapreneurship league as examples.
Some of them have explored the concepts of Entrepreneurial Orientation (EO) and Intrapreneurship (IP).
This article glances through seven designs: self-management and self-organization, intrapreneurship, virtual ephemeral structures, the neuroscienced organization, the accultured organization, the transparent organization and the agora organization.
Terms that are more recent include intrapreneurship (Antoncic, Hisrich 2001; Kuratko 2002; Pinchot 1985), venture entrepreneurship (Tang, Koveos 2004), corporate intrapreneurship (Dess et al.
Finally, EE can also be seen in the light of so-called intrapreneurship (Antoncic and Hisrich 2003), i.
According to the promoters of Turn8, people who can participate in the initiative may fall in any of the following categories: creative geniuses with an idea for innovative business and technology, policy makers working to build an entrepreneurial infrastructure, wisdom dealers (mentors) sharing their business expertise with the next generation of entrepreneurs, smart sellers (service providers) supporting teams with their service and product offerings, investors/opportunity hunters seeking ROI from vetted startups, innovative businesses seeking innovation breakthroughs through competitions, sponsorships and intrapreneurship and DP World staff who wish to exercise their entrepreneurialism.
Next time I will discuss another form of how innovation happens in organisations: Intrapreneurship.
Canada, the US, and Egypt offer examples of successful intrapreneurship examples.