Introspectionist


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In`tro`spec´tion`ist


n.1.(Metaph.) One given to the introspective method of examining the phenomena of the soul.
References in periodicals archive ?
For psychologists and students, he brings together 14 chapters by psychologists in the US and UK who address the evolution of self-observation, including myths surrounding the introspectionist tradition, the early history of self-report measures in psychology, and the three-stage myth of movement from introspection to behaviorism to cognitivism; the theory and practice of contemporary self-observation, including its use as a linguistic and social practice, principles for conducting self-observation research, and a multi-modal introspection theory; and history, theory, and practice in the phenomenological and narrative traditions, including ethnographic perspectives.
The reliance of some artists on their experience above Cardenang else is well captured by that introspectionist par excellence Marcel Proust when he wrote that art is "notre vraie vie, la realite telle que nous l'avons sentie et qui differe tellement de ce que nous croyons" [our true life, reality as we have experienced it and that differs so much from what we believe] (Proust, 1912-1927/1954, p.
Against positions denying that stimulus or response are psychological primitives, Kantor (1969) pointed out that even psychologists with the most mentalistic and introspectionist leanings study "the reactions [responses] of certain persons, called subjects, to certain things, called stimulus objects" (p.
When the introspectionist thinks he has withdrawn into a wholly private realm of events disparate in kind from other events, made out of mental stuff, he is only turning his attention to his own soliloquy.
It is not that psychological phenomena and the causal laws governing them cannot be mathematized at all, but only that under a specific, then-prominent, introspectionist conception of psychology its phenomena cannot be treated geometrically.
His own lyric poetry, an inspiring influence on the younger Introspectionist poets who emerged after World War I, tends toward a neo-Wordsworthian and Symbolist love of nature, of "mountain storms" and "evening sounds" and "the maid of the mist," a reverie on a seductive maiden dancing in the mist above Niagara Falls; he favored fables and gnomic stories and exotic (for New York Yiddish audience)Japanese and Chinese motifs.
The author mentions examples of "people oriented introspectionist.
Pieris categorizes four attitudes to prayer: the self-conscious introverts, the task-oriented extroverts, the people-oriented extroverts and the people-oriented introspectionists.
Can the psychophysical experiment reconcile introspectionists and objectivists?