ire


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ire

 (īr)
n.
Anger; wrath. See Synonyms at anger.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin īra; see eis- in Indo-European roots.]

ire

(aɪə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literary anger; wrath
[C13: from Old French, from Latin īra]
ˈireful adj
ˈirefully adv
ˈirefulness n
ˈireless adj

ire

(aɪər)

n.
intense anger; wrath.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin īra anger]
ire′ful, adj.
ire′ful•ly, adv.
ire′ful•ness, n.

Ire.

Ireland.

ire

, rage, fury - Ire suggests greater intensity than anger, rage suggests loss of self-control, and fury is destructive rage verging on madness.
See also related terms for madness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ire - a strong emotionire - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
emotion - any strong feeling
fury, rage, madness - a feeling of intense anger; "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned"; "his face turned red with rage"
enragement, infuriation - a feeling of intense anger
umbrage, offense, offence - a feeling of anger caused by being offended; "he took offence at my question"
indignation, outrage - a feeling of righteous anger
huffiness - a passing state of anger and resentment
hackles, dander - a feeling of anger and animosity; "having one's hackles or dander up"
bad temper, ill temper - a persisting angry mood
vexation, annoyance, chafe - anger produced by some annoying irritation
2.ire - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)ire - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"

ire

noun anger, rage, fury, wrath, passion, indignation, annoyance, displeasure, exasperation, choler Their ire was directed mainly at the two instigators.

ire

noun
1. Violent or unrestrained anger:
2. A strong feeling of displeasure or hostility:
Translations
viha

ire

[aɪəʳ] N (liter) → ira f, cólera f
to rouse sb's ireprovocar la ira de algn

ire

[ˈaɪər] n (= wrath, fury) → ire f

ire

n (liter)Zorn m
References in classic literature ?
Hunt, roused the ire of M'Lellan; who, calling to mind old grievances, began to look round for his rifle, as if he really intended to carry his threat into execution and shoot him on the spot; and it was with some difficulty that Mr.
My error was my error, and my crime My crime; whatever, for itself condemned, And will alike be punished, whether thou Reign or reign not--though to that gentle brow Willingly I could fly, and hope thy reign, From that placid aspect and meek regard, Rather than aggravate my evil state, Would stand between me and thy Father's ire (Whose ire I dread more than the fire of Hell) A shelter and a kind of shading cool Interposition, as a summer's cloud.
He endeavored, in a general way, to express a particular disapproval, and only succeeded in arousing the ire and opposition of his father-in-law.
He swallowed his ire for the moment, but he afterwards wrote to decline further attendance in the case.
Time and again the colossal bull tossed the enormous tiger high into the air, but each time that the huge cat touched the ground he returned to the encounter with apparently undiminished strength, and seemingly increased ire.
I could not suppress a low laugh; there was ire in her glance and defiance in her attitude.
The fellow knew his master's plans sufficiently well to understand that he had done something to arouse the ire of the Big Bwana and that it would fare ill with them all if they were overtaken in Big Bwana's country.
But one thing they lacked, the thing that he possessed, the flame of mastery that would not quench, that burned fiercely as ever in the disease- wasted body, and that was ever ready to flare forth and scorch and singe them with its ire.
And at the words Michael bristled, dragged himself clear of the woman's detaining hands, and, with a snarl, whirled about to get a look at the black boy who must have just then entered the room and aroused the white god's ire.
Oliver's offence having been explained to him, with such exaggerations as the ladies thought best calculated to rouse his ire, he unlocked the cellar-door in a twinkling, and dragged his rebellious apprentice out, by the collar.
Will he, so wise, let loose at once his ire, Belike through impotence, or unaware, To give his Enemies thir wish, and end Them in his anger, whom his anger saves To punish endless?
My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.