ironstone

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i·ron·stone

 (ī′ərn-stōn′)
n.
1. A hard white pottery.
2. A rock containing enough iron to permit commercial extraction; an iron ore.

ironstone

(ˈaɪənˌstəʊn)
n
1. (Geological Science) any rock consisting mainly of an iron-bearing ore
2. (Ceramics) Also called: ironstone china a tough durable earthenware

i•ron•stone

(ˈaɪ ərnˌstoʊn)

n.
1. any iron-bearing mineral or rock with siliceous impurities.
2. Also called i′ronstone chi′na. a hard white stoneware.
[1515–25]

ironstone

Hard, white pottery introduced by C J Mason in the nineteenth century.
Translations

ironstone

[ˈaɪənˌstəʊn] N (= china) → porcelana f resistente

ironstone

[ˈaɪənstəʊn] nminerale m di ferro
References in periodicals archive ?
There it is stated that "At this writing the exact location of the Iron Stone site is unknown.
This green belt area has been protected since Bolckow and Vaughan discovered iron stone in Eston Hills.
The drilling program will comprise 2,200 meters of reverse circulation drilling on the Robe River pisolitic iron stone target and the Ashburton magnetite targets.
Or, for the traditional cook, go back in time with tried and tested old fashioned methods - weighing out ingredients with a vintage mechanical scales, beating the mix by hand with a bowl and spoon and baking on a cast iron stone for the perfect scones and biscuits.
A BSF team not only saved the shrine by creating an iron stone caging along the river bank but also helped over 20 isolated villages of the Kalimath valley to reconnect with the main land through three Tyrolean traverse ropeways.
The identified six ecological zones, he noted, were the green belt tropical, iron stone plateau, flat plains, Nile-Sobat corridor, the semi-arid areas and the hilly mountains, which are of the Mediterranean type.
It has a marking underneath which reads NWAO Staffordshire NWAO Iron Stone and measures 10 3/4 inches.
On the par-three seventh he stopped a seven iron stone dead, six feet from the hole and the birdie putt was a formality.
Later SW Allen, in his reminiscences of 1918, details the ``Prince of Wales Engine'' which ``hauled the iron stone from below, which was then taken by donkey back to the works''.
She cooked and baked on the cook stove with appliances made of cast iron, crocks, and iron stone.
And as a sign he left his face, in the craggy profile of the iron stone, with distinctive markings that would later be carved onto the holy ribstones, small monuments set on the tops of hills that would become strong hunting medicine and spiritual connecting points between the hunters, the bison and the Great Manitou.