Iroquois

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Related to Iroquois Confederacy: Iroquois Confederation

Ir·o·quois

 (ĭr′ə-kwoi′)
n. pl. Iroquois (-kwoi′, -kwoiz′)
1. A member of a Native American confederacy, known as the Iroquois League or the Iroquois Confederacy, inhabiting New York State and originally composed of the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca peoples, known as the Five Nations. After 1722 the confederacy was joined by the Tuscaroras to form the Six Nations.
2. Any or all of the languages of the Iroquois. In both senses also called Haudenosaunee.

[French, probably of Algonquian origin.]

Ir′o·quois′ adj.

Iroquois

(ˈɪrəˌkwɔɪ; -ˌkwɔɪz)
n, pl -quois
1. (Peoples) a member of any of a group of North American Indian peoples formerly living between the Hudson River and the St Lawrence and Lake Erie. See also Five Nations, Six Nations
2. (Languages) any of the Iroquoian languages
adj
3. (Languages) of or relating to the Iroquois, their language, or their culture
4. (Peoples) of or relating to the Iroquois, their language, or their culture

Ir•o•quois

(ˈɪr əˌkwɔɪ, -ˌkwɔɪz)

n., pl. -quois.
a member of any of the American Indian peoples, orig. centered in New York, that comprise the Five Nations confederacy: surviving Iroquois live primarily in New York, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Ontario, and Quebec.

Iroquois

A native North American people originally living between the Hudson and St Lawrence rivers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Iroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York StateIroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York State; the Iroquois League were allies of the British during the American Revolution
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Cayuga - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living around Cayuga Lake in New York State
Cherokee - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living in the Appalachian Mountains but now chiefly in Oklahoma
Erie - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living on the south shore of Lake Erie in northern Ohio and northwest Pennsylvania and western New York
Mohawk - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living along the Mohawk River in New York State
Oneida - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living east of Lake Ontario
Onondaga - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living between Lake Champlain and the Saint Lawrence River
Seneca - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living in New York State south of Lake Ontario
Tuscarora - a member of an Iroquois people who formerly lived in North Carolina and then moved to New York State and joined the Iroquois
2.Iroquois - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Iroquois
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Cherokee - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee
Cayuga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cayuga
Mohawk - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Mohawk
Seneca - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Seneca
Oneida - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Oneida
Onondaga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Onondaga
Tuscarora - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Tuscarora
Translations
Irokese

Iroquois

[ˈɪrəkwɔɪ]
A. ADJiroqués
B. N
1.iroqués/esa m/f
2. (Ling) → iroqués m
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider the Iroquois Confederacy, which was a matriarchy: Men could not declare war; the only ones who could were women.
Lyle belongs to the Onondaga, one of the six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy.
Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolb said, The opening of the Seneca Art & Cultural Center at the Ganondagan State Historic Site affords visitors a unique opportunity to immerse in the rich history of the Iroquois Confederacy.
Oren Lyons said he and other members of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, a group of Indian nations based in New York, came to the event with a purpose.
Hiawatha and the Peacemaker" is a stunning musical and narrative retelling of a treasured Mohawk tale of the origin of the Six Nations, the Iroquois Confederacy, or the Haudenosaunee, people of the Long House.
Many of the Iroquois Confederacy chiefs from as far away as Thunder Bay, Grand Island, New York and eastern Ontario were present.
Also known as the Iroquois Confederacy, the Six Nations includes the Onondaga, Mohawk, Seneca, Cayuga, Oneida, and Tuscorara nations.
He outlines the Southern and Northern Indian Groups, as well as the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, and Ohio Valley Indian groups.
The Haudenosaunee Confederacy is often referred to as the "Six Nations," or Iroquois Confederacy.
And from the Iroquois Confederacy we learn that it is possible for nations to join voluntarily in a confederacy that balances the power of large tribes and small tribes, that gives authority to central leadership while preserving the interdependence of each tribe, and that even balances power between men and women.
The study then looks at how Sir William Johnson and his Iroquois backers sought to project an image of unity to the indigenous representatives of the Grand Council of the Iroquois Confederacy, as they negotiated a boundary that would secure the interests of the eastern Iroquois.
For American Indians from the Iroquois Confederacy (located mostly in New York state and southern Ontario), lacrosse is more than just a sport; it is the Creator's Game, a medicine, which, when played in the right spirit, becomes a vehicle for people to reconnect with the world and become whole again.