Iroquois

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Related to Iroquois Confederacy: Iroquois Confederation

Ir·o·quois

 (ĭr′ə-kwoi′)
n. pl. Iroquois (-kwoi′, -kwoiz′)
1. A member of a Native American confederacy, known as the Iroquois League or the Iroquois Confederacy, inhabiting New York State and originally composed of the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca peoples, known as the Five Nations. After 1722 the confederacy was joined by the Tuscaroras to form the Six Nations.
2. Any or all of the languages of the Iroquois. In both senses also called Haudenosaunee.

[French, probably of Algonquian origin.]

Ir′o·quois′ adj.

Iroquois

(ˈɪrəˌkwɔɪ; -ˌkwɔɪz)
n, pl -quois
1. (Peoples) a member of any of a group of North American Indian peoples formerly living between the Hudson River and the St Lawrence and Lake Erie. See also Five Nations, Six Nations
2. (Languages) any of the Iroquoian languages
adj
3. (Languages) of or relating to the Iroquois, their language, or their culture
4. (Peoples) of or relating to the Iroquois, their language, or their culture

Ir•o•quois

(ˈɪr əˌkwɔɪ, -ˌkwɔɪz)

n., pl. -quois.
a member of any of the American Indian peoples, orig. centered in New York, that comprise the Five Nations confederacy: surviving Iroquois live primarily in New York, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Ontario, and Quebec.

Iroquois

A native North American people originally living between the Hudson and St Lawrence rivers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Iroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York StateIroquois - any member of the warlike North American Indian peoples formerly living in New York State; the Iroquois League were allies of the British during the American Revolution
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Cayuga - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living around Cayuga Lake in New York State
Cherokee - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living in the Appalachian Mountains but now chiefly in Oklahoma
Erie - a member of an Iroquoian people formerly living on the south shore of Lake Erie in northern Ohio and northwest Pennsylvania and western New York
Mohawk - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living along the Mohawk River in New York State
Oneida - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living east of Lake Ontario
Onondaga - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living between Lake Champlain and the Saint Lawrence River
Seneca - a member of the Iroquoian people formerly living in New York State south of Lake Ontario
Tuscarora - a member of an Iroquois people who formerly lived in North Carolina and then moved to New York State and joined the Iroquois
2.Iroquois - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Iroquois
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Cherokee - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cherokee
Cayuga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Cayuga
Mohawk - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Mohawk
Seneca - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Seneca
Oneida - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Oneida
Onondaga - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Onondaga
Tuscarora - the Iroquoian language spoken by the Tuscarora
Translations
Irokese

Iroquois

[ˈɪrəkwɔɪ]
A. ADJiroqués
B. N
1.iroqués/esa m/f
2. (Ling) → iroqués m
References in periodicals archive ?
The Iroquois Confederacy refers to the political, military, and economic alliance formed by the Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, and Mohawk Tribes (the Tuscarora tribe joined later).
Staats noted, "Many of the Band members are adherents of the Iroquois Confederacy, who under no circumstances would have anything to do with an election process set up by the Federal government.
To understand the importance of the Clan Mother in the framework of Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) tradition and society, it is necessary to know something of the basic structure of the six nations that make up the Iroquois Confederacy.
and Ontario, with particular strength in the traditional stomping grounds of the Iroquois Confederacy (who now send their own national team to the World Lacrosse Championships).
One inspiration was the Great Binding Law of the Iroquois Confederacy.
As an informative and scholarly analytical survey of the many Native American nations ranging from the southern, central, and northern America, The Americas Might Have Been covers the Mayan, Incan, and Iroquois Confederacy, as well as the Eskimo, Taino Arawak, Navajo, Pueblo, Aztec nations, and others, providing an impressive account of the many Native American national social systems.
Peace Walker is bracketed by brief historical chapters about the Iroquois confederacy which pre-dated European contact and which would inspire democratic precedents amongst white North Americans.
Once at Chiefswood, chiefs, clan mothers and faith keepers of the Iroquois Confederacy greeted the Unity Ride and Run.
With these words begins Gayanerekowa, the Great Law of Peace, also called the Great Law or the Great Peace, under which five nations--Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca--ended their years of warring to form the Iroquois Confederacy.
On the Indian side, Bourne employs the biographies of Samuel Kirkland and Joseph Brant, and the way the Revolution tore the Iroquois Confederacy apart.
Richter's well-known study of the Iroquois Confederacy in the first centuries of European contact, The Ordeal of the Longhouse (1992), is so copiously detailed and finely documented that I often find myself treating it like a reference book and more than just a scholarly monograph.