J-stroke

J-stroke

 (jā′strōk′)
n.
A basic paddling stroke made typically from the stern of a canoe in which the paddle is drawn back and the blade is then turned outward at the end of the stroke in order to prevent the bow from veering off course.

[From the shape of the letter J traced by the stroke when made on the port side .]
References in periodicals archive ?
A few weeks later, a Maine friend taught me the J-stroke, the maneuver that allows you to control the canoe from one side.
After five days, I could climb to the top of the climbing wall, control the ropes at the bottom, perform a proper J-stroke, do a wet exit from a kayak without getting caught in the spray skirt and I could name every one of the 15 other kids my age at the camp, the legacy of a thousand name games our counsellors put us through.
Time should be set aside for instruction, not simply playing, but learning to do better -- for example, perfecting the j-stroke rolling a kayak, swinging a bat, or identifying pines, hemlocks, and poison ivy.