Democratic-Republican Party

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Democratic-Republican Party

n.
A political party in the United States that was opposed to the Federalist Party and was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792 and dissolved in 1828.

Democratic-Republican Party

n
(Historical Terms) US history the antifederalist party originally led by Thomas Jefferson, which developed into the modern Democratic Party

Democrat′ic-Repub′lican Par`ty


n.
a U.S. political party opposed to the Federalist Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792.
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Noun1.Democratic-Republican Party - a former major political party in the United States in the early 19th century; opposed the old Federalist party; favored a strict interpretation of the constitution in order to limit the powers of the federal government
party, political party - an organization to gain political power; "in 1992 Perot tried to organize a third party at the national level"
References in periodicals archive ?
American democracy was not consolidated until Jacksonian Democrats lost the presidency to the Whigs in 1840.
Rather than being a partisan project of Jacksonian Democrats, the movement for judicial elections swept through the political system and became a broadly supported proposition.
As the Jeffersonian era came to a close, Jacksonian Democrats took up the argument that equal rights meant citizens' equal right to advancement on the basis of merit.
Second, I profile these nineteenth-century antecedents, focusing on the restoration efforts of Jacksonian Democrats James K.
Jefferson and his allies in what eventually became the Democratic Party were avowedly partisan, and the Jacksonian Democrats of the next generation went on to build a "disciplined, even quasi-military" party organization, Wilentz notes.
The followers of the populist hard-money movement have become what we now refer to as Jacksonian Democrats because they succeeded in electing a hard-money advocate, Andrew Jackson, to the presidency.
More than Andrew Jackson's populism, improved transportation and communication facilitated increased participation in politics, leading to the creation of mass political parties (such as Jacksonian Democrats and Whigs), to reform movements (such as temperance, antislavery, and women's rights)--but also to more intense confrontations between opposing factions.
He shows how rival conceptions of History distinguished the world views of Jacksonian Democrats from those of their opponents, the often forgotten Whigs.
Jacksonian Democrats developed a "spoils system" of loyal party placeholders to discourage the entrenchment of a professional bureaucracy and to promote the party's national agenda.
Jacksonian Democrats put these well-worn convictions into action by opposing federal subsidies for internal improvements, challenging the prevalence of banks and exclusive corporate charters, and insisting on a sparingly administered federal government exercising expressly delegated powers.
Rivaling the Jacksonian Democrats in the power struggle, it was compelled to abandon the politics of deference, vying for popular support indispensable for party politics and co-opting David Crockett as their popular hero.