Jacobean

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Related to Jacobeans: Jacobean English

Jac·o·be·an

 (jăk′ə-bē′ən)
adj.
Of or having to do with the reign of James I of England or his times.
n.
A prominent figure during this period.

[From New Latin Iacobaeus, from Late Latin Iacōbus, Iacobus, James, Jacob; see Jacob.]

Jacobean

(ˌdʒækəˈbɪən)
adj
1. (Historical Terms) history characteristic of or relating to James I of England or to the period of his rule (1603–25)
2. (Furniture) of or relating to the style of furniture current at this time, characterized by the use of dark brown carved oak
3. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of architecture used in England during this period, characterized by a combination of late Gothic and Palladian motifs
n
(Historical Terms) any writer or other person who lived in the reign of James I
[C18: from New Latin jacōbaeus, from Jacōbus James]

Jac•o•be•an

(ˌdʒæk əˈbi ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to James I of England or to his period.
2. of or pertaining to the style of literature and drama produced during the early 17th century.
n.
3. a writer, statesman, or other personage of the Jacobean period.
[1750–60; < New Latin Jacobae(us) of Jacobus (Latinized form of James) + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jacobean - any distinguished personage during the reign of James IJacobean - any distinguished personage during the reign of James I
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
Adj.1.Jacobean - of or relating to James I or his reign or times; "Jacobean writers"
Translations
jakobínský

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] ADJde la época de Jacobo I (de Inglaterra)

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] adjjacobéen(ne)

Jacobean

adjaus der Zeit Jakobs I.

Jacobean

[ˌdʒækəˈbiːən] adj (Brit) → dell'epoca di Giacomo I
References in classic literature ?
We have already observed that, as Shakspere's career suggests, there was no abrupt change in either life or literature at the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603; and in fact the Elizabethan period of literature is often made to include the reign of James I, 1603-1625 (the Jacobean period [Footnote: 'Jaco'bus' is the Latin form of 'James.
The second place among the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists is universally assigned, on the whole justly, to Ben Jonson, [Footnote: This name is spelled without the
When they were together the Jacobean and the Victorian ages were juxtaposed.
It was a farm-house tea, and to Philip very quaint and charming in that Jacobean house.
This was destroyed by fire in 1543, and some of its smoke-blackened corner stones were used when, in Jacobean times, a brick country house rose upon the ruins of the feudal castle.
When the Jacobean version of the New Testament was in process of
But you must think of that lonely death in the tawdry dressing-room simply as a strange lurid fragment from some Jacobean tragedy, as a wonderful scene from Webster, or Ford, or Cyril Tourneur.
The Jacobeans may have continued to build on Elizabethan precedents, but the period between 1603 and 1650 was also full of architectural experiment.
FORGET modern-day celebrity chefs such as Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsay - the Jacobeans also knew how to cook up a treat.
By making explicit what is submerged in published texts, this poem offers a useful counter-example to Orgel's claim that Jacobeans found it impossible "to acknowledge sodomy as an English vice" (46-48).
Along with the staple casual and comfortable looks, fabric suppliers said, manufacturers were looking for a hint of formality, provided by damasks, Jacobeans and traditional florals, often with a botanical feeling.
Wills argues that England's obsession with necromancy made the second half of Macbeth (Hecate's jazzy witch songs) as interesting to the Jacobeans as the first half is to us.