Jacobite Rebellion

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Jacobite Rebellion

n
1. (Historical Terms) history Brit the unsuccessful Jacobite rising of 1715 led by James Francis Edward Stuart
2. (Historical Terms) the last Jacobite rising (1745-46) led by Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, which after initial successes was crushed at Culloden
References in periodicals archive ?
As viewers will remember, the couple went to the City of Love in Season 2 for a while when they were trying to stop the Jacobite Rising.
Dilston was the home of James Radcliffe, 3rd Earl of Derwentwater, who was executed for his leading role in the 1715 Jacobite rising Northumberland.
This prompted a Jacobite rising the following year, joined belatedly by James himself, who landed in Scotland in December 1715 and was proclaimed king in a drumhead ceremony (the improvised swords of state used on the occasion appear here).
Jacobite Rising Trainer: Larry Byrne 6th, 2m1/2f bumper, Punchestown, May 31 This French-bred son of Rob Roy had finished last on his sole point-topoint start in early May, but there was a lot more promise to be gleaned from his track debut in a Punchestown bumper that may produce its share of winners.
John Erskine, the Earl of Mar, was leader of the Jacobite Rising of 1715.
The 1746 battle was the last to be held on British soil and spelled a very bloody end to the Jacobite Rising.
Built in the 12th century by both the kings of England and Scotland, it became a frontier fortress that saw medieval skirmishes, a Civil War siege (the longest in English history) and Bonnie Prince Charlie's Jacobite rising.
Scott's historical novel features Edward Waverley, a young English soldier in the Hanoverian army, who is sent to Scotland where he becomes involved in the Jacobite rising of 1745-6, the last civil war fought on British soil and the unsuccessful attempt to reinstate the Stuart monarchy, represented by Prince Charles Edward.
After participating in the Jacobite Rising of 1745, Robin and Prudence, brother and sister, become engaged in a swashbuckling, romantic adventure.
Although it is a work of historical fiction, it was set around real events in Scotland in the 18th century, and in particular the 1752 Appin murder which took place in the wake of the Jacobite Rising of 1745.
Any realistic chance of a Jacobite rising, as generally acknowledged, at the time (41) and since, depended heavily on significant foreign support from the major maritime powers, France and Spain--England's foremost colonial rivals--and intermittently Russia, the center of influential Jacobite exiles during the early Hanoverian period.