jerking

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jerk 1

 (jûrk)
v. jerked, jerk·ing, jerks
v.tr.
1. To give a sudden quick thrust, push, pull, or twist to.
2. To throw or toss with a quick abrupt motion.
3. To utter abruptly or sharply: jerked out the answer.
4. To make and serve (ice-cream sodas, for example) at a soda fountain.
5. Sports To press (a weight) overhead from shoulder height in a quick motion.
v.intr.
1. To move in sudden abrupt motions; jolt: The train jerked forward.
2. To make spasmodic motions: My legs jerked from fatigue.
n.
1. A sudden abrupt motion, such as a yank or twist.
2. A jolting or lurching motion.
3. Physiology A sudden reflexive or spasmodic muscular movement.
4. jerks Involuntary convulsive twitching often resulting from excitement. Often used with the.
5. Slang A foolish, rude, or contemptible person.
6. Sports A lift in which the weight is heaved overhead from shoulder height with a quick motion.
Phrasal Verbs:
jerk off Vulgar Slang
To masturbate.
jerk around
To take unfair advantage of, deceive, or manipulate.

[Origin unknown.]

jerk′er n.
jerk′ing·ly adv.

jerk 2

 (jûrk)
tr.v. jerked, jerk·ing, jerks
To cut (meat) into long strips and dry in the sun or cure by exposing to smoke.
adj.
Being or relating to a method of barbecuing meat that has been seasoned and wrapped in leaves of the allspice tree: jerk chicken.

[Back-formation from jerky.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jerking - an abrupt spasmodic movement
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
Adj.1.jerking - lacking a steady rhythm; "an arrhythmic heartbeat"
unsteady - subject to change or variation; "her unsteady walk"; "his hand was unsteady as he poured the wine"; "an unsteady voice"
References in periodicals archive ?
Lots of the dishes are seasoned with Jamaican jerk spice and extra bottles of jerk sauce are already on your table.
He first shot to prominence when he appeared on the BBC show Dragons' Den, where he managed to secure a PS50,000 investment for his Jamaican jerk spice sauce called Reggae Reggae.
So while American consumers may not season this year's Fourth of July hamburgers with Jamaican jerk spice, it's a distinct possibility for the future.