jambiya

(redirected from Jambia)

jambiya

(dʒæmˈbiːjə)
n
a curved, double-edged dagger that is worn in the belt in the Middle East, esp in Yemen
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In May, in Hajja governorate, a local tribal sheikh, a social leader in Yemen, used his jambia, a traditional Yemeni dagger, to threaten an employee at the government-owned Electricity Corporation over an alleged dispute.
The health and quality of women's life is further damaged by vector-borne diseases such as schistosomiasis (bilharzia) which disproportionately affect women because they, more than men, stand in water to transplant rice, wash clothes or collect drinking water, and are especially vulnerable during menses (MacCormack and Jambia, 1996).
Yemeni men in traditional attire dance with daggers called jambia.
suni vyavahara subu(dhi)hi pandia (7) 'having heard' sabaka ghara urbbaha palati jani jambia (7) 'having turned' parakkhi yata sangini (9) 'having observed/noticed' lajjalu ki paisi matala (11) 'having penetrated' kahu ancara dhari khancae (11) 'having held'
A man's futah and jambia are often topped with machine-made Western shirts, but women, rarely seen on the streets, are covered head to toe.
The discovery of ancient weapons "shows the continuity of the Yemenis' lifestyle", says Hanna Banna Chidiac: "Already, they were at the same time good farmers and great warriors: But the Jambia (traditional Yemeni dagger) has taken over from the sword".
Tenders are invited for Construction Of Girls Hostel Building (Excluding Elctrification) At - Govt Ashram School Jambia In Tah - Etapalli Dist - Gadchiroli
Revenge [killings] will never be eliminated as long as people do not trust the law, and the military doesn't intervene in tribal conflicts Some NDC members objected to some sheikhs entering the conference with a Jambia (a traditional Yemeni dagger).
The health and quality of women's life is further damaged by vector-borne diseases such as schistosomiasis (bilharzia) which disproportionately affect women because they, more than men, stand in water to transplant flee, wash clothes or collect drinking water, and are especially vulnerable during menses (MacCormack and Jambia, 1996).
Wearing traditional Yemeni clothes, including a jambia (a dagger with a short curved lade worn on a belt), the bearded Ali said, "There is nothing called love before marriage and this concept -- love -- was brought to our society by the Western movies and series with the aim of damaging our culture and erasing our identity.
The Jambia is part of the Yemeni legacy and clothing that dates back to the pre-Islamic period.