Jansenism


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Related to Jansenism: quietism, Cornelius Jansen

Jan·sen·ism

 (jăn′sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The theological principles of Cornelis Jansen, which emphasize predestination, deny free will, and maintain that human nature is incapable of good. They were condemned as heretical by the Roman Catholic Church.

Jan′sen·ist n.

Jansenism

(ˈdʒænsəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the doctrine of Cornelis Jansen and his disciples, who maintained that salvation was limited to those subject to a supernatural determinism, the rest being destined to perdition
2. (Roman Catholic Church) the religious movement arising from these doctrines
ˈJansenist n, adj
ˌJansenˈistic, ˈJansenˌistical adj

Jan•sen•ism

(ˈdʒæn səˌnɪz əm)

n.
the doctrinal system of Cornelis Jansen, denying free will and maintaining that human nature is corrupt and that Christ died for the elect and not for all people: condemned as heretical by the Catholic Chruch.
[1650–60; < French jansénisme]
Jan′sen•ist, n.
Jan`sen•is′tic, Jan`sen•is′ti•cal, adj.

Jansenism

a Christian sect founded by Cornelius Jansen, 17th-century Dutch religious reformer. See also heresy.
See also: Religion
a heretical doctrine of the 17th and 18th centuries denying free-dom of the will, accepting absolute predestination for part of mankind and condemnation to hell for the others, and emphasizing puritanical moral attitudes. — Jansenist, n., adj.
See also: Heresy

Jansenism

A Catholic sect, latterly centered on the Port Royal lay convent in Paris, which denied free will and promoted austerity and church reform. Condemned by Pope in 1713, the ensuing controversy split the French church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jansenism - the Roman Catholic doctrine of Cornelis Jansen and his disciples; salvation is limited to those who are subject to supernatural determinism and the rest are assigned to perdition
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
Translations

Jansenism

[ˈdʒænsəˌnɪzəm] Njansenismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
We had no Enlightenment because we had no Reformation, nor a religious intellectual movement such as French Jansenism.
And needless elementary mistakes occur in regard to matters far beyond American Jewish history, such as the theories of Benedict Anderson and Max Weber and the relationship between Ultramontanism and Jansenism in the Catholic Church.
Readers who have a solid understanding of the conflict between Jesuits and Jansenists will find fresh perspective here, while those who have never heard of Jansenism will learn enough to follow Prest's arguments.
However, Smidt draws attention to the fact that Spanish Jansenism and regalist reform of the Church overshadowed the matters of religious reform because they did not correspond with the aims of the state (437-39).
This collection of 18 essays belongs to a revival of scholarly interest in Jansenism gathering momentum in recent years after a heyday of publications in the 1960s and 1970s.
Within the broader historical context of the times, the Sacred Heart devotion was an antidote to attempts by the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century and Jansenism in the seventeenth century to distort one of the essential truths of divine Revelation, namely, God's love for all people.
Among the other essays is one by Therese-Marie Jallais, who discovered the Wansleben manuscript, which takes up the affinities between Harrington's republicanism and other movements, such as Jansenism and Gallicanism.
In particular, he wanted the liturgy in Solesmes to be celebrated according to the Roman Rite without the additions and innovations that were present in liturgies celebrated throughout France because of the influence of Gallicanism and Jansenism.
Occasionalism, Jansenism and Scepticism; Divine Providence and the Order of Grace", Irish Theological Quarterly, num.
At the very least, his assessment of Jansenism, a form of rigorous Catholic piety that discourages frequent communion, emphasizes a nearly Calvinist sense of predestination, and condemns the majority of the faithful to eternal damnation, hides another intertextual allusion.
The number and frequency of communions are startling to a European and dispose of the charges of Jansenism often loosely preferred against the Irish clergy" (EAR 386).
Any religious organisation in which the doctrine of predestination plays a role, such as Calvinism, Presbyterianism, Jansenism and Quietism, incorporates elements of Gnostic thought, though not the heretical parts.