Jean de Meung

(redirected from Jean de Meun)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Jean de Meung

(French ʒɑ̃ də mœ̃)
n
(Biography) real name Jean Clopinel. ?1250–?1305, French poet, who continued Guillaume de Lorris' Roman de la Rose. His portion of the poem consists of some 18 000 lines and contains satirical attacks on women and the Church
References in periodicals archive ?
Long thought to be written by Jean de Meun, and often published along with the Roman de la Rose, it is clear that this poem was written by Perreal himself.
E nesse largo panorama em que o conhecimento e objetivo a atingir que emerge a escrita de A epistola ao deus do amor, como replica contra o Romance da rosa (1), de Guillaume de Lorris (1200-1238) e Jean de Meun (1240-1305), que se pauta por uma visao diminuida da mulher.
He cited the classical Greek translation by the Byzantine, Maximus Planoudes (1255-1305), (27) and the French translation by Jean de Meun (c.
El tema parece haber sido desarrollado en el poema titulado Roman de la Rose--escrito por Guillaume de Lorris hacia 1237 y luego continuado por Jean de Meun entre 1268 y 1278--, uno de los mas leidos y de mayor difusion en su epoca (26).
As Hult frames the debate, Christine's epistolary response to Jean de Montreuil's panegyric on the Rose and its second author Jean de Meun was its catalyst.
Language and the Declining World in Chaucer, Dante and Jean de Meun.
Alain de Lille and Jean de Meun offer influential early examples of this reconceptualization.
Part I examines Gower's most immediate literary influences: for form, the interrogatory mode of confessional guides and the exemplum, and for meaning, the dits of Guillaume de Machaut and the figure of Nature in Alain de Lille and Jean de Meun.
Machan here edits a vulgate text (not an 'authorial' one) of De consolatione philosophiae by Boethius; Li Livres de confort, a translation of the same by Jean de Meun (c.
The trick that Jean de Meun plays occurs in the mid-point of the conjoined text: in a speech by Amor, the Lover, Amant, is suddenly named as Guillaume de Lorris.
The letters of Abelard and Heloise have attracted an audience ever since the thirteenth century, when Jean de Meun, the author of The Romance of the Rose, brought them to the attention of his readers by quoting a particularly provocative line by Heloise.
Hutcheson's "The Sodomitic Moor: Queerness in the Narrative of Reconquista" and Susan Schiaboff's "Sodomy's Mark: Alan of Lille, Jean de Meun, and the Medieval Theory of Authorship" contribute to our understanding of their respective subjects.