Jensenism

Jensenism

the belief that blacks are mentally inferior to whites, based on results of intelligence tests that failed to account for such differences as test questions slanted in favor of whites, lack of cultural and educational oppor-tunities among blacks, etc. — Jensenist, n., adj.
See also: Race
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Heritability and racism: A Marxist critique of Jensenism.
Jensenism, described as one of the great heresies of 20th century science, continued to inspire heated debate at the London School of Economics for the next two years, culminating in a physical assault on Professor Eysenck when he came to give us a lecture in 1973 on "The Biological Basis of Intelligence.
It seemed to me that by its impact on diverse areas of behavioral science, Jensenism might help complete the Darwinian revolution.
Science is a never ending journey and Jensenism has traveled far since 1969.
Jensenism is redefined, not in terms of his notions about the genetics of intelligence, but in terms of the personal qualities and beliefs that have made Jensen a researcher of note: going against convention, tackling controversial topics with empiricism, refusing to be intimidated by threats and picket lines, and being flexible enough to modify his beliefs.
My own, personal dictionary, not to be found in any bookstore or publishing house, has a different definition of Jensenism, one that more accurately portrays the man and his work:
The above view of Jensenism differs, in all likelihood, from other contributors here.
A new definition of Jensenism, based on the Jansenist heresy, is provided.
Jensenism exalts the influence of the genes (grace) made available by mother nature (Christ the Redeemer).
Jensenism refers to the aspect of his work that violated the taboo, specifically his conclusion that individual differences in intelligence are highly heritable and group differences may be too.
As a neutral descriptor, Jensenism provides but an old snapshot of Jensen's science because it has moved far beyond the issue of heritability.