Jephthah


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Jeph·thah

 (jĕf′thə)
In the Bible, a judge of Israel who vowed to sacrifice to God the first thing to come out of his house to greet him upon his return, in exchange for victory over the Ammonites. He was victorious and, upon returning home, was met by his only child, a daughter.

Jephthah

(ˈdʒɛfθə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament a judge of Israel, who sacrificed his daughter in fulfilment of a vow (Judges 11:12–40). Douay spelling: Jephte
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A few hundred years later, after Abraham's land of promise is settled by his descendants, Jephthah the judge is fully prepared to thwart his own future with the ritual murder of his only daughter.
Other studies explore the role of Jephthah in the history of interpretation and reception, the domestic shrine of Micah, prophets in Judges (Deborah and the anonymous prophet of chap.
Jephthah was willing to sacrifice his wife's or daughter.
By way of contrast, ambiguous heroes are described as being inspired by the spirit of Y-H-V-H, Jephthah in Judges 11:29, and Samson multiple times (Judg.
She may also be viewed as the only daughter of the ancient judge Jephthah, or like Jephthah himself, who promises to sacrifice to God the first thing coming out of his house in exchange for God's help against his enemies, and he is then met by his daughter (Judges 11.
JEPHTHAH Burnett, who has died aged 85, was a dedicated pentecostal minister who worked tirelessly for his local community.
a) an otherwise unknown "judge" or deliverer of Israel: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], "Then'the LORD sent Jerub- baal and Bedan and Jephthah and Samuel, and delivered you from the hands of your enemies all around, so that you lived in security" (1 Sam.
40) This allusion to the biblical story of Jephthah was placed on the American battle standards.
O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou
The book, dedicated to the memory of Ephraim's own father, really gets into its stride when it begins talking about the relationships of female Jewish characters to their fathers, beginning with adaptations of the biblical story of Jephthah and his daughter, whom in Judges 11 he is forced to sacrifice, and moving on to Marlowe's Abigail and Shakespeare's Jessica.
I would also nominate Jephthah, Samson, Saul, Ahab, Naomi, and Esther as characters with persuasive power.
Of such kind of sin is that [account of] Jephthah, who, on account of his oath, sacrificed his very own daughter (Judges [11:30-40]).