Jerry


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Jer·ry

 (jĕr′ē)
n. pl. Jer·ries Chiefly British Slang
A German, especially a German soldier.

[Alteration of German.]

jerry

(ˈdʒɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. Brit an informal word for chamberpot
2. (Units) short for jeroboam

Jerry

(ˈdʒɛrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. a German, esp a German soldier
2. the Germans collectively: Jerry didn't send his bombers out last night.

Jer•ry

(ˈdʒɛr i)

n., pl. -ries. Brit. Informal.
a German soldier.
[1910–15; appar. alter. of German; see -y2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jerry - offensive term for a person of German descent
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
German - a person of German nationality
Translations

jerry

[ˈdʒerɪ]
A. N (Brit) → orinal m
B. CPD jerry can Nbidón m

Jerry

2 [ˈdʒerɪ] N (Brit) (Mil) a Jerryun alemán
Jerrylos alemanes

Jerry

n (esp Mil sl) (= German soldier)deutscher Soldat, Deutsche(r) m; (= the Germans)die Deutschen pl

jerry

n (dated Brit inf: = chamber pot) → Pott m (inf), → Thron m (inf)

jerry

:
jerry-builder
jerry-building
jerry-built
jerry can
ngroßer (Blech)kanister
References in classic literature ?
Behind Ed Griffith's saloon old Jerry Bird the town drunkard lay asleep on the ground.
Jerry had a cab of his own, and two horses, which he drove and attended to himself.
Mas'r wants you to cotch Bill and Jerry," said Andy, cutting short Sam's soliloquy.
It was an hour after sunup that I heard the boys coming, and recognized the hoof-beats of Pomp and Caesar and Jerry, old mates of mine; and a welcomer sound there couldn't ever be.
Come to call on old uncle Jerry and pass the time o' day, hev ye?
And the first house we come to was this Jerry Moore's.
when I took my wife along on the cruise of the Minota, we found on board a nigger-chasing, adorable Irish terrier puppy, who was smooth-coated like Jerry, and whose name was Peggy.
Let us stay for once, and see how he compares with Jerry.
I'll ask Jerry " And the barkeeper turns and addresses some man sitting at a table or leaning against the bar farther along, and who may be Jerry, or Tom, or Bill.
It was plain that Jerry had usurped the functions of his cab, and was carrying a "load.
The remaining brace were Lord Dawlish's friend Jerry and his father, a formidable old man who knew all the shady secrets of all the noble families in England.
Neither Short nor the landlord nor Thomas Codlin, however, was in the least surprised, merely remarking that these were Jerry's dogs and that Jerry could not be far behind.