Jewess

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Jew·ess

 (jo͞o′ĭs)
n. Offensive
A Jewish woman or girl.

Jewess

(ˈdʒuːɪs)
n
(Judaism) often offensive a Jewish girl or woman

Jew•ess

(ˈdʒu ɪs)

n. Older Use: Usually Offensive.
(a term used to refer to a Jewish girl or woman.)
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jewess - a woman who is a JewJewess - a woman who is a Jew      
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties
Translations
jødinde
jødinne
judinna

Jewess

[ˈdʒuːɪs] N (o.f., gen pej) → judía f

Jewess

nJüdin f

Jewess

[ˈdʒuːɪs] n (offensive) → ebrea
References in periodicals archive ?
L'hitraot (see you soon), fellow Jewesses -- or as my phone would try to make me say instead, "Hit raptors
There's a time for a dad to say, referring to his daughters, "Nope, no sonsjust four little Jewesses.
For example, Brice's "Becky from Babylon," about a New York Jewess who learned to shake it like an "Oriental," parodied both the exotic Jewesses and ghetto girls that Brice frequently portrayed (177).
Rosenbaum and her colleagues at the Jewish Women's Archive operate one called Jewesses With Attitude.
Yet Clara, like the other female characters, is pretty, and one contemporary reviewer (referring to the text rather than the images) remarked upon the undeniable "glamour of [Besant's] youthful Jewesses.
From Felicie Bernstein, who imported French Impressionism to Berlin, to Berta Zuckerkandl, journalist-midwife of the Vienna Secession; from Ada Leverson and Genevieve Straus, who reigned over Belle Epoque aesthetes in London and Paris, to Gertrude Stein and her Cubists; from the Stettheimer sisters in New York to Salka Viertel's emigre circle in Hollywood, vivacious Jewesses fertilized the flowers of modern culture with conversation and contacts.
Other overt references to his Jewishness were erased: the detail of his pronunciation of the word bet as pet was removed; the recollection of his childhood as "a little Jew boy" was revised to "little boy"; and the "crowds of Jewesses, beautiful women, with their false pearls, with their false hair" was changed simply to "crowds" (Dick).
Monica Szurmuk, romance languages, discusses "Jewish Tales, Latin American Landscapes: Errant Jewesses in the Pampas.