Jobs


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job 1

 (jŏb)
n.
1.
a. A regular activity performed in exchange for payment, especially as one's trade, occupation, or profession: Her job is doing drug research.
b. A position of employment: How many jobs are open at the factory?
2.
a. A task that must be done: Let's finish this job before we start another.
b. A specified duty or responsibility: Your job is to watch the kids while we're away. See Synonyms at task.
c. Informal A difficult or strenuous task: It's a real job getting people to help out at these events.
3.
a. A specific piece of work to be done for a set fee: an expensive repair job.
b. The object to be worked on: Those overgrown shrubs are a big job.
c. Something resulting from or produced by work: I like the job they did on those shrubs.
4. An operation done to improve one's appearance, or the result of such an operation. Often used in combination: a face job.
5. Computers A program application that may consist of several steps but is performed as a single logical unit.
6. Informal A state of affairs: Their marriage was a bad job from the start. It's a good job that we left early to avoid the traffic.
7. Informal A criminal act, especially a robbery: a bank job.
8. Informal An example of a specified type, especially of something made or constructed. Often used in combination: a new building that is just another glass and steel job; a cowboy hat that is one of those ten-gallon jobs.
v. jobbed, job·bing, jobs
v.intr.
1. To work at odd jobs.
2. To work by the piece.
3. To act as a jobber.
v.tr.
1. To purchase (merchandise) from manufacturers and sell it to retailers.
2. To arrange for (contracted work) to be done in portions by others; subcontract.
3. To transact (official business) dishonestly for private profit.
Idioms:
do a job on
1. To damage, harm, or worsen: The stylist did a real job on my hair.
2. To defecate on.
on the job
1. Paying close attention; on the alert.
2. At work; at one's place of business: Employees are not allowed to smoke while on the job.

[Perhaps from obsolete jobbe, piece, alteration of Middle English gobbe, lump; see gob1.]

job 2

 (jŏb) Chiefly Southern
tr. & intr.v. jobbed, job·bing, jobs
To jab or make a jab.
n.
A jab.

[Middle English jobben, of imitative origin.]

Job 1

 (jōb)
In the Bible, an upright man whose faith in God survived the test of repeated calamities.

[Hebrew 'iyyôb; see ʔb in Semitic roots.]

Job 2

 (jōb)
n.
See Table at Bible.

[After Job.]

Jobs

 (jŏbz), Steven Paul 1955-2011.
American computer engineer who cofounded Apple Computers (1975) and served as the company's chairman (1981-1985) and CEO (1997-2011).

Jobs

(dʒɒbz)
n
(Biography) Steve, full name Steven Paul Jobs. 1955–2011, US computer scientist and executive: co-founder (with Steve Wozniak, 1976) of the Apple computer company
References in classic literature ?
Jo helps me with the sewing, and insists on doing all sorts of hard jobs.
The men who had jobs in the asylum had found out I was a newspaper reporter.
There were always odd jobs to be done about the barn on holidays, and the men were busy until afternoon.
Come back soon, or I shall be gone to my farm; for I begin to find these wood-sawing jobs a little too tough for my back-ache.
It's the old woman's tricks to be giving cobbling jobs.
When they paid him off he dodged the company gamblers and dramshops, and so they tried to kill him; but he escaped, and tramped it home, working at odd jobs, and sleeping always with one eye open.
Ye see," said Marks to Haley, stirring his punch as he did so, "ye see, we has justices convenient at all p'ints along shore, that does up any little jobs in our line quite reasonable.
He had set up and printed off two little jobs for farmers in that printing-office -- horse bills -- and took the money, four dollars.
Of course at first they all found their new jobs very hard to do--all except Chee-Chee, who had hands, and could do things like a man.
I desired the queen's woman to save for me the combings of her majesty's hair, whereof in time I got a good quantity; and consulting with my friend the cabinet-maker, who had received general orders to do little jobs for me, I directed him to make two chair-frames, no larger than those I had in my box, and to bore little holes with a fine awl, round those parts where I designed the backs and seats; through these holes I wove the strongest hairs I could pick out, just after the manner of cane chairs in England.
They illustrate the nature of the big jobs that the telephone has to offer to an ambitious and gifted young man of to-day.
We must invest more in our own people, in their jobs, and in their future, and at the same time cut our massive debt.