John Donne


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Noun1.John Donne - English clergyman and metaphysical poet celebrated as a preacher (1572-1631)John Donne - English clergyman and metaphysical poet celebrated as a preacher (1572-1631)
References in periodicals archive ?
IN THE SIXTH STATION OF HIS DEVOTIONS UPON EMERGENT OCCASIONS, John Donne considers the "stifling spirit, a spirit of suffocation" of fear, which he "find[s] in thy book," the bible.
Widely-tipped poets John Donne and Eavan Boland appeared along with a "refreshingly straightforward" comparative section.
The books five chapters discuss the religious lives and writings of John Dee, John Donne, Sir Kenelm Digby, Henry and Thomas Vaughan, and Jane Lead, who all subscribed to fluid religiosities that defied distinct labels.
John Donne and Religious Authority in the Reformed English Church.
Set in England in the year 1604, Love's Alchemy: A John Donne Mystery is a dark novel of intrigue, Machiavellian political maneuvering, spywork, and the crossroads of history.
The program will also showcase a performance of Ernest Bloch's Concerto Grosso for String Orchestra and Piano Obbligato, featuring pianist Loren Fishman, and Nativity after John Donne - a new work by local composer Justin Merritt.
Over the course of the play Zoe reflects on her life and her condition through the details of the English language, especially the use of wit in the metaphysical poetry of John Donne, and continuously recites Donne's Holy Sonnet X, Death Be Not Proud.
Linden, "Compasses and Cartography: John Donne's A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,"' John Donne Journal 3.
ANSWERS: 1 The javelin; 2 A hare; 3 Captain Nemo; 4 It appears to be of infinite length; 5 Postage stamps; 6 Tungsten; 7 Sven Goran-Eriksson; 8 Labor unions; 9 The Pacific; 10 John Donne.
Among their topics are riddling in The Marriage of Sir Gawain, A Meditation of a Penitent Sinner and the problem of ascription, the enigma of divine revelation in Tourneur's The Atheist's Tragedy, the arcana imperii in the sermons of John Donne, and John Milton and Histories of Ireland (1633).
Ask not for whom the bell tolls, Mr Clegg, as poet John Donne might have put it.
He quoted an extract from For Whom the Bell Tolls by John Donne and Pity the Nation by Khalil Gibran in his 321 word addition to the detailed order.