brave new world

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brave new world

n.
1. A world or realm of radically transformed existence, especially one in which technological progress has both positive and negative results.
2. A field, endeavor, or aspect of life that seems new and often intimidating because one is experiencing it for the first time: "You're on your own. Welcome to the brave new world of do-it-yourself travel" (Susan Stellin).

[Originally a phrase written by William Shakespeare in The Tempest (c.1610): How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world / That has such people in't! (later used by Aldous Huxley as the title of his novel Brave New World (1932), a depiction of future dystopia in which humans are separated into rigid castes and controlled through technological and chemical means ).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Sophie's character comes face to face with the antithesis of society, John the Savage, who has been brought from the Reservation, where people still marry, have children and live in families.
To be brief, my disappointment can be summed up in two questions: Since John the Savage is the obvious "protagonist" of this novel, why don't any of these three scholars refer to his many statements?
Into this world is introduced John the Savage, who was abandoned with his mother in a primitive outpost by a former Director of (human) Hatcheries.