Jonah


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Related to Jonah: Book of Jonah

Jo·nah 1

 (jō′nə)
In the Bible, a prophet who was swallowed by a great fish and disgorged unharmed three days later.

[Hebrew yônâ, dove; see ywn in Semitic roots.]

Jo·nah 2

 (jō′nə)
n.
1. See Table at Bible.
2. One thought to bring bad luck.

[After Jonah.]

Jonah

(ˈdʒəʊnə) or

Jonas

n
1. (Bible) Old Testament
a. a Hebrew prophet who, having been thrown overboard from a ship in which he was fleeing from God, was swallowed by a great fish and vomited onto dry land
b. the book in which his adventures are recounted
2. a person believed to bring bad luck to those around him; jinx
ˌJonahˈesque adj

Jo•nah

(ˈdʒoʊ nə)

n.
1. a Minor Prophet who, for his impiety, was thrown overboard from his ship and swallowed by a large fish, remaining in its belly for three days before being cast up onto the shore unharmed.
2. a book of the Bible bearing his name.
3. a person or thing regarded as bringing bad luck.
Jo`nah•esque′, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jonah - (Old Testament) Jonah did not wish to become a prophet so God caused a great storm to throw him overboard from a shipJonah - (Old Testament) Jonah did not wish to become a prophet so God caused a great storm to throw him overboard from a ship; he was saved by being swallowed by a whale that vomited him out onto dry land
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
2.jonah - a person believed to bring bad luck to those around him
unfortunate, unfortunate person - a person who suffers misfortune
3.Jonah - a book in the Old Testament that tells the story of Jonah and the whale
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Nebiim, Prophets - the second of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures
Translations
Jonas
JonaJonas
JoonaJoonas
Jónás
ヨナ書
JonaJonasongeluksbrenger
JonaJonas
JonaJonas

Jonah

[ˈdʒəʊnə] NJonás

Jonah

nJona(s) m

Jonah

[ˈdʒəʊnə] nGiona m (fig) → iettatore/trice
References in classic literature ?
within are shabby shelves, ranged round with old decanters, bottles, flasks; and in those jaws of swift destruction, like another cursed Jonah (by which name indeed they called him), bustles a little withered old man, who, for their money, dearly sells the sailors deliriums and death.
One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
I like Revelations, and the book of Daniel, and Genesis and Samuel, and a little bit of Exodus, and some parts of Kings and Chronicles, and Job and Jonah.
Had I been as great a friend of Jonah as I am of D'Artagnan I should have followed him even into the inside of the whale itself; and you would have done the same, Aramis.
They lived in cabins that looked like canoes; being, for the most part formed of the jaw-bone of a whale, put up as rafters, across which were laid pieces of driftwood covered over with long grass, the skins of large sea animals, and earth; so as to be quite comfortable, in despite of the rigors of the climate; though we are told they had as ancient and fish-like an odor, "as had the quarters of Jonah, when he lodged within the whale.
I heard ye talkin' to dad, an' I ha'af looked you'd be swallered up, same's Jonah.
It was from Jaffa that Jonah sailed when he was told to go and prophesy against Nineveh, and no doubt it was not far from the town that the whale threw him up when he discovered that he had no ticket.
Themselves at least he had never been unnatural enough to banish from his house, and it seemed hardly eccentric that he should have kept away Brother Jonah, Sister Martha, and the rest, who had no shadow of such claims.
Jonah argued that men liked to make a surprise of their wills, while Martha said that nobody need be surprised if he left the best part of his money to those who least expected it.
Jonah was the wit among the Featherstones, and joked with the maid- servants when they came about the hearth, but seemed to consider Miss Garth a suspicious character, and followed her with cold eyes.
Anyway no one can charge you with being a Jonah, Mr.
Perhaps this has all befallen us on your account, like Jonah in the ship of Tarshish.