Judaism


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Ju·da·ism

 (jo͞o′dē-ĭz′əm, -dā-, -də-, jo͞o-dā′-)
n.
1. The monotheistic religion of the Jews, tracing its origins to Abraham and having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Hebrew Scriptures and the Talmud.
2. Conformity to the traditional ceremonies and rites of the Jewish religion.
3. The cultural, religious, and social practices and beliefs of the Jews.

[Middle English Iudaisme, from Old French Judaisme, from Late Latin Iūdaismus, from Greek Ioudaismos, from Ioudaios, Jew; see Jew.]
Usage Note: The standard pronunciations for this word are (jo͞o′dē-ĭz′əm) and (jo͞o′dā-ĭz′əm). In our 2001 survey, the first was the preferred choice of 37 percent of the Usage Panel, and the second was favored by 40 percent. The less common variants (jo͞o′də-ĭz′əm) and (jo͞o-dā′ĭz′əm) were the choice of 19 percent and 7 percent of the Panel, respectively. Interestingly, each of these four variants was considered unacceptable by roughly one fifth of the Panelists.

Judaism

(ˈdʒuːdeɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Judaism) the religion of the Jews, based on the Old Testament and the Talmud and having as its central point a belief in the one God as transcendent creator of all things and the source of all righteousness
2. (Judaism) the religious and cultural traditions, customs, attitudes, and way of life of the Jews
ˌJudaˈistic adj

Ju•da•ism

(ˈdʒu diˌɪz əm, -də-)

n.
1. the monotheistic religion of the Jews, based on the precepts of the Old Testament and the teachings and commentaries of the rabbis as found chiefly in the Talmud.
2. belief in and conformity to this religion, its practices, and ceremonies.
3. this religion considered as forming the basis of the cultural and social identity of the Jews.
4. Jews collectively; Jewry.
[1485–95; < Late Latin < Greek]
Ju′da•ist, n.
Ju`da•is′tic, adj.

Judaism


an attitude or policy of hatred and hostility toward Jewish people. — anti-Semite, n.
Hasidism, def. 2.
1. the principles or doctrines of the cabala, a system of theosophy, theurgy, and mystical Scriptural interpretive methods originated by rabbis about the 8th century and affecting later Christian thinkers.
2. an interpretation made according to these doctrines.
3. an extreme traditionalism in theological concepts or Biblical interpretation.
4. obscurantism, especially that resulting from the use of obscure vocabulary. — cabalist, n. — cabalistic, adj.
the scattering of the Jews after the period of Babylonian exile.
a student of or expert on the Gemara, or second book of the Talmud. — Gemaric, adj.
the state or quality of being non-Jewish. — gentile, n., adj.
1. the explanatory matter in rabbinic and Talmudic literature, interpreting or illustrating the Scriptures.
2. a book in which is printed the liturgy for the Seder service. — haggadic, haggadical, adj.
1. a student of the Haggada.
2. a writer of the Haggada.
the entire body of Jewish law, comprising Biblical laws, oral laws transcribed in the Talmud, and subsequent codes altering traditional teachings. — Halakist, Halachist, n. — Halakic, adj.
1. the beliefs and practices of a mystical Jewish sect, founded in Poland about 1750, characterized by an emphasis on prayer, religious zeal, and joy.
2. the beliefs and practices of a pious sect founded in the 3rd century B.C. to resist Hellenizing tendencies and to promote strict observance of Jewish laws and rituals. Also Assideanism. — Hasidic, adj. — Hasidim, n. pi.
the thought, spirit, and practice characteristic of the Hebrews. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraistical, adj.
1. the Jewish people collectively.
2. an area inhabited solely or mostly by Jews.
1. the Jewish religion, rites, customs, etc.
2. adherence to the Jewish religion, rites, etc. — Judaist, n.Judaic, Judaistic, adj.
a hatred of Jews and of Jewish culture. Also called Judaeophobia.
a Jewish theology based on literal interpretation of the Old Testament and rejection of rabbinical commentary. — Karaite, n.
the custom under the Mosaic code (Deut. xxv: 5-10) that required a widow to marry her dead husband’s brother if she had no sons. — levirate, leviratical, adj.
any of the Jewish scribes of the 10th century who compiled the Masora. — Masoretic, — Masoretical, adj.
1. a belief in a Messiah coming to deliver the Jews, restore Israel, and rule righteously, first mentioned by the Prophet Isaiah.
2. the Christian belief that Jesus Christ was the Messiah prophesied.
3. the vocation of a Messiah. — Messianic, adj.
the condition of being rooted in Mosaic tradition.
1. the system of laws and rituals established by Moses.
2. devotion to the Mosaic laws. — Mosaist, n. — Mosaic, adj.
1. the beliefs and practices of an ancient Jewish sect, especially strictness of religious observance, close adherence to oral laws and traditions, and belief in an afterlife and a coming Messiah. Cf. Sadducecism.
2. (l.c.) the behavior of a sanctimonious and self-righteous person. — Pharisee, pharisee n. — Pharisaic, pharisaic, adj.
the philosophy of Philo Judaeus, lst-century B.C. Alexandrian, combining Judaism and Platonism and acting as a precursor of Neoplatonism. — Philonian, adj. — Philonic, adj.
the beliefs, practices, and precepts of the rabbis of the Talmudic period. — rabbinic, rabbinical, adj.
the beliefs and principles underlying a strict observance of the Sabbath. — Sabbatarian, n., adj.
the beliefs and practices of an ancient Jewish sect made up largely of the priestly aristocracy and opposing the Pharisees in both political and doctrinal matters, especially literal and less legalistic interpretation of the Jewish law, rejection of the rabbinical and prophetic traditions, and denying immortality, retribution in a future life, and the existence of angels. Cf. Phariseeism. — Sadducee, n. — Sadducean, adj.
the beliefs and actions of Jewish scribes during the life of Christ.
the study of Semitic languages and culture. — Semitist, Semiticist, n.
1. the state or quality of being Jewish.
2. anything typical or characteristic of Judaism, as customs, beliefs, influence, etc.
Torah, def. 2.
1. the teachings of the collection of Jewish law and tradition called the Talmud.
2. the observance of and adherence to these teachings. — Talmudist, n. — Talmudic, adj.
1. the first flve books of the Old Testament; the Pentateuch.
2. a scroll of these scriptures in Hebrew used for liturgical purposes. Also called Sepher Torah.
3. the entire body of Jewish law and tradition as found in the Old Testament and the Talmud.
a writer of tosaphoth.
the explanatory and critical glosses made usually in the margins of Talmudic literature.
1. the worship of Yahweh (Jehovah).
2. the act or custom of naming Jehovah Yahweh.
the beliefs, activities, and spirit of an ancient radical group in Judea that advocated overthrowing Roman rule.
a worldwide Jewish movement for the establishment in Palestine of a national homeland for Jews. — Zionist, Zionite, n. — Zionist, Zionistic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Judaism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the TalmudJudaism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Jewish Orthodoxy, Orthodox Judaism - Jews who strictly observe the Mosaic law as interpreted in the Talmud
Conservative Judaism - Jews who keep some of the requirements of the Mosaic law but allow for adaptation of other requirements (as some of the dietary laws) to fit modern circumstances
Reform Judaism - the most liberal Jews; Jews who do not follow the Talmud strictly but try to adapt all of the historical forms of Judaism to the modern world
Jewry - Jews collectively
2.Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
mitsvah, mitzvah - (Judaism) a good deed performed out of religious duty
aliyah - (Judaism) immigration of Jews to Israel; "students making aliyah"
mikvah - (Hebrew) a ritual purification and cleansing bath that Orthodox Jews take on certain occasions (as before Sabbath or after menstruation)
Passover supper, Seder - (Judaism) the ceremonial dinner on the first night (or both nights) of Passover
Ark, Ark of the Covenant - (Judaism) sacred chest where the ancient Hebrews kept the two tablets containing the Ten Commandments
holy of holies, sanctum sanctorum - (Judaism) sanctuary comprised of the innermost chamber of the Tabernacle in the temple of Solomon where the Ark of the Covenant was kept
menorah - (Judaism) a candelabrum with nine branches; used during the Hanukkah festival
Menorah - (Judaism) a candelabrum with seven branches used in ceremonies to symbolize the seven days of Creation
prayer shawl, tallith, tallis - (Judaism) a shawl with a ritually knotted fringe at each corner; worn by Jews at morning prayer
synagogue, tabernacle, temple - (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
Tabernacle - (Judaism) a portable sanctuary in which the Jews carried the Ark of the Covenant on their exodus
Qabbala, Qabbalah, Cabala, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabbala, Kabbalah - an esoteric theosophy of rabbinical origin based on the Hebrew scriptures and developed between the 7th and 18th centuries
Cabalism, Kabbalism - the doctrines of the Kabbalah
mitsvah, mitzvah - (Judaism) a precept or commandment of the Jewish law
monotheism - belief in a single God
Orthodox Judaism - beliefs and practices of a Judaic sect that strictly observes Mosaic law
Conservative Judaism - beliefs and practices of Conservative Jews
Reform Judaism - beliefs and practices of Reform Jews
Megillah - (Judaism) the scroll of parchment that contains the biblical story of Esther; traditionally read in synagogues to celebrate Purim
Torah - (Judaism) the scroll of parchment on which the first five books of the Hebrew Scripture is written; is used in a synagogue during services
Talmudic literature - (Judaism) ancient rabbinical writings
aliyah - (Judaism) the honor of being called up to the reading desk in the synagogue to read from the Torah; "he was called on for an aliyah"
Midrash - (Judaism) an ancient commentary on part of the Hebrew scriptures that is based on Jewish methods of interpretation and attached to the biblical text
phylactery, tefillin - (Judaism) either of two small leather cases containing texts from the Hebrew Scriptures (known collectively as tefillin); traditionally worn (on the forehead and the left arm) by Jewish men during morning prayer
Hallel - (Judaism) a chant of praise (Psalms 113 through 118) used at Passover and Shabuoth and Sukkoth and Hanukkah and Rosh Hodesh
bar mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 13th birthday of a Jewish boy and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility; "a bar mitzvah is an important social event"
bas mitzvah, bat mitzvah, bath mitzvah - (Judaism) an initiation ceremony marking the 12th birthday of a Jewish girl and signifying the beginning of religious responsibility
blintz, blintze - (Judaism) thin pancake folded around a filling and fried or baked
challah, hallah - (Judaism) a loaf of white bread containing eggs and leavened with yeast; often formed into braided loaves and glazed with eggs before baking
Jewish rye, Jewish rye bread - (Judaism) bread made with rye flour; usually contains caraway seeds
kishke, stuffed derma - (Judaism) roasted fowl intestines with a seasoned filling of matzo meal and suet
dibbuk, dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
Kabbalist, Cabalist - a student of the Jewish Kabbalah
golem - (Jewish folklore) an artificially created human being that is given life by supernatural means
Sabbatarian - one who observes Saturday as the Sabbath (as in Judaism)
Feast of Booths, Feast of Tabernacles, Succos, Succoth, Sukkoth, Tabernacles - a major Jewish festival beginning on the eve of the 15th of Tishri and commemorating the shelter of the Israelites during their 40 years in the wilderness
Hebrew calendar, Jewish calendar - (Judaism) the calendar used by the Jews; dates from 3761 BC (the assumed date of the Creation of the world); a lunar year of 354 days is adjusted to the solar year by periodic leap years
Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, Rosh Hashanah, Rosh Hashona, Rosh Hashonah - (Judaism) a solemn Jewish feast day celebrated on the 1st or 1st and 2nd of Tishri; noted for the blowing of the shofar

Judaism

Jewish denominations and sects

Chassidism, Chasidism, Hassidism, or Hasidism, Conservative Judaism, Liberal Judaism, Orthodox Judaism, Reform Judaism, Zionism
Translations
الديانَةُ اليَهوديَّه
judaismusžidovství
jødedom
juutalaisuus
judaizam
judaizmus
judaizmas
iudaism
judaizmus
judovstvo

Judaism

[ˈdʒuːdeɪɪzəm] Njudaísmo m

Judaism

[ˈdʒuːdeɪɪzəm] njudaïsme m

Judaism

nJudaismus m

Judaism

[ˈdʒuːdeɪˌɪzm] ngiudaismo

Judaism

(ˈdʒuːdeizem) noun
the Jewish religion, based on the Jewish Scriptures.
References in classic literature ?
All were silent; for none thought it safe, in the presence of the Grand Master, to avow any interest in the calumniated prisoner, lest he should be suspected of leaning towards Judaism.
But, as I stood under the blackened, groined arches of that old synagogue, made dimly visible by the seven thin candles in the sacred lamp, while our Jewish cicerone reached down the Book of the Law, and read to us in its ancient tongue--I felt a shuddering impression that this strange building, with its shrunken lights, this surviving withered remnant of medieval Judaism, was of a piece with my vision.
Casaubon as to the unsound opinions of Middleton concerning the relations of Judaism and Catholicism; and passed easily to a half-enthusiastic half-playful picture of the enjoyment he got out of the very miscellaneousness of Rome, which made the mind flexible with constant comparison, and saved you from seeing the world's ages as a set of box-like partitions without vital connection.
Zarathustra now meets the last pope, and, in a poetical form, we get Nietzsche's description of the course Judaism and Christianity pursued before they reached their final break-up in Atheism, Agnosticism, and the like.
Messianic Judaism Is Not Christianity": A Loving Call To Unity by Stan Telchin (an octogenarian, Messianic Jew, and for fourteen years the senior pastor of a church in Maryland made up of Jews and Gentiles from every walk of life, denomination, size and color) specifically addresses the growing problem of the concept of Messianic Judaism originally intended to appeal to Jewish people unexpectedly appeal to Gentiles.
As editor of JUDAISM, I asked leaders of the various American Jewish religious streams to comment on his book, as a means of focusing a general discussion about the condition of Reform Judaism today.
Brownfeld, Executive Director of the American Councilfor Judaism, and is reprinted with permission from their publication IS SUES, which may be found at www.
By any standard, Shoulson's work is impressively learned, rich in implication, and attentive to the subtleties of what we might call the poetics of theological speculation, a poetics that, in the context of either post-Temple Judaism or post-Civil War England, has a decidedly political edge as well.
Judaism and Christianity share a special sibling relationship.
As Jesus's denial of this-worldly life was the cause of his alienation from Judaism and of his refutation of the national infrastructure of the monotheistic ideal, another scenario was required for Jesus's feud with Judaism.
He recounts the long ordeal of a gentile woman who agrees to convert to Judaism to appease her Orthodox in-laws, only to find herself in the middle of a fierce battle among Denver's rabbis about what makes a true conversion.