Judas Maccabaeus


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Judas Maccabaeus

(ˌmækəˈbiːəs)
n
(Biography) Jewish leader, whose revolt (166–161 bc) against the Seleucid kingdom of Antiochus IV (Epiphanes) enabled him to recapture Jerusalem and rededicate the Temple

Mac•ca•bae•us

(ˌmæk əˈbi əs)

n.
Judas or Judah ( “the Hammer” ), died 160 b.c., Judean patriot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Judas Maccabaeus - Jewish leader of a revolt in Judea that recovered Jerusalem around 166 BCJudas Maccabaeus - Jewish leader of a revolt in Judea that recovered Jerusalem around 166 BC; hero of the Apocryphal books I Maccabees and II Maccabees (?-161 BC)
References in classic literature ?
The choicest tapestries which the looms of Arras could furnish draped the walls, whereon the battles of Judas Maccabaeus were set forth, with the Jewish warriors in plate of proof, with crest and lance and banderole, as the naive artists of the day were wont to depict them.
The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah commemorates Judas Maccabaeus, who successfully fought for freedom.
They are equally poignant and lyrical in "To Thee, Thou Glorious Son of Worth" also from Theodora, and commanding in the double-dotted rhythms of "FromThis Dread Scene" from Judas Maccabaeus.
Gewalt--Bedrohung--Krieg: Georg Friedrich Handels Judas Maccabaeus, edited by Dominik Hoink and Jurgen Heidrich.
The later essays (1992-2001), by Burrows and Hicks, focus on individual works from the final years of Handel's composing career: Hercules, Balshazzar, Judas Maccabaeus, Alexander Balus, Joshua, Susanna, Solomon, Theodora, and Jephtha.
THE Choral Society combined thrillingly with a large contingent of singers from the Osaka Symphonic Chorus for this performance of Judas Maccabaeus, one of Handel's best-known oratorios.
Handel's Judas Maccabaeus, performed by the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and star soloists, glorifies the Duke of Cumberland's victory in 1746 in which 2000 Jacobites died.
Handel's oratorio Judas Maccabaeus premiered at Covent Garden in 1747, the year after the last major land battle fought on British soil.
Some slaves, nevertheless, identified with Judas Maccabaeus and with Moses.
The 18th-century German composer Handel composed the music for the oratorio Judas Maccabaeus.
In 1996 the Maryland Handel Festival's chronological progress through Handel's oratorios arrived at Judas Maccabaeus, marking with a stirring performance the 250th anniversary of the event which that oratorio commemorates, the final battle of the '1745' Jacobite rebellion against the Hanoverian regime at Culloden on 16 April 1746.