judicial activism

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judicial activism

n.
Judicial lawmaking that exceeds the proper exercise of judicial authority, especially when concerned with matters ordinarily addressed by a legislature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.judicial activism - an interpretation of the U.S. constitution holding that the spirit of the times and the needs of the nation can legitimately influence judicial decisions (particularly decisions of the Supreme Court)
interpreting, rendering, rendition, interpretation - an explanation of something that is not immediately obvious; "the edict was subject to many interpretations"; "he annoyed us with his interpreting of parables"; "often imitations are extended to provide a more accurate rendition of the child's intended meaning"
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that judicial activist present cases of such violations in foreign countries and refuse to present their claims inside the country.
The Palais Royale, a residential tower and the tallest building planned for Mumbai, has met problems in its construction and come under attack from judicial activist NGO Janhit Manch for 'blatant irregularities' .
However, Bhagwanji Rayani, a judicial activist who heads the Janhit Manch, an organisation that has filed 55 public interest litigations, believes the 31-storey structure should be confiscated by the government and given back to the public.
These examples, chosen from among legions available, demonstrate that the conservatives have succeeded in defining the debate: a judge is either a judicial activist or a conservative.
Religious Right groups, however, branded Kagan a far-left judicial activist and unleashed a barrage of e-mails and letters against her.
The Arizona senator calls Sotomayor a judicial activist who tried to walk back from that record during her confirmation hearings.
That Arbour, 59, is in the eye of the controversy is no surprise to those who watched her at home, where she earned a reputation on the bench as a left-wing judicial activist.
A legitimate judicial activist who changes the law to accommodate new social realities does so based on society's values, not the judge's personal views, he says.
It's too early to say whether he will be a judicial activist on the court.
Contributing Editor Cathy Young calls out conservative Justice Antonin Scalia as a judicial activist (page 22), and former heroin addict Maia Szalavitz contributes a stirring "defense of happy pills" such as Prozac and Zoloft (page 48).
First, the judicial activist trend is even more dramatic than a review of Supreme Court decisions might suggest.
This judicial activist stampede to redefine marriage is making a mockery of the ideals that our Founding Fathers stood for.