Juggernaut

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jug·ger·naut

 (jŭg′ər-nôt′)
n.
An overwhelming or unstoppable force: "With the newly empowered juggernaut of the Pentagon bureaucracy gaining momentum, the president was no longer in control" (James Carroll).

[Hindi jagannāth, title of Krishna, from Sanskrit jagannāthaḥ, lord of the world : jagat, moving, the world (from earlier present participle of jigāti, he goes; see gwā- in Indo-European roots) + nāthaḥ, lord (from nāthate, he helps, protects).]
Word History: For centuries, the Indian city of Puri has held an annual festival in honor of the god Krishna, worshiped under his Sanskrit title Jagannāthaḥ, "Lord of the World." In the middle of the rainy season, devotees transport highly adorned figures representing Krishna, his brother Baladeva, and his half-sister Subhadra from the temple where they usually reside to another temple some two and a half miles away. There, Krishna enjoys the new locale until his return a week or two later. Krishna and his siblings are transported in three chariots—massive towerlike structures about 45 feet high, mounted on many wheels, and lavishly decorated. Thousands of devotees pull the chariots with ropes and are cheered on by a crowd of over a million pilgrims. Worshipers try to obtain blessings by touching the ropes, and some have been crushed in the throng or have fallen under the wheels. Early Western observers in colonial India greatly exaggerated the number of these deaths, however, and sensationalized reports of the incidents led to the borrowing of Jagannāthaḥ into English as juggernaut, "an irresistible force that rolls unstoppably over its victims."

Juggernaut

(ˈdʒʌɡəˌnɔːt)
n
1. (Hinduism) a crude idol of Krishna worshipped at Puri and throughout Odisha (formerly Orissa) and Bengal. At an annual festival the idol is wheeled through the town on a gigantic chariot and devotees are supposed to have formerly thrown themselves under the wheels
2. (Hinduism) a form of Krishna miraculously raised by Brahma from the state of a crude idol to that of a living god
[C17: from Hindi Jagannath, from Sanskrit Jagannātha lord of the world (that is, Vishnu, chief of the Hindu gods), from jagat world + nātha lord]

juggernaut

(ˈdʒʌɡəˌnɔːt)
n
1. any terrible force, esp one that destroys or that demands complete self-sacrifice
2. (Automotive Engineering) Brit a very large lorry for transporting goods by road, esp one that travels throughout Europe

Jug•ger•naut

(ˈdʒʌg ərˌnɔt, -ˌnɒt)

n.
1. (often l.c.) any large, overpowering, destructive force or object.
2. (often l.c.) anything requiring blind devotion or cruel sacrifice.
3. an idol of Krishna, at Puri in Orissa, India, annually drawn on a huge cart under whose wheels devotees are said to have thrown themselves to be crushed.
[1630–40; < Hindi Jagannāth < Skt Jagannātha lord of the world]

juggernaut

- Derived from Sanskrit Jagannamacrtha, "lord of the world," a title of Krishna, worshipped at an annual festival by the dragging of his image through the streets in a heavy chariot.
See also related terms for streets.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Juggernaut - a massive inexorable force that seems to crush everything in its wayjuggernaut - a massive inexorable force that seems to crush everything in its way
power, force - one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority; "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil"
2.Juggernaut - an avatar of VishnuJuggernaut - an avatar of Vishnu      
3.Juggernaut - a crude idol of Krishna
graven image, idol, god - a material effigy that is worshipped; "thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image"; "money was his god"
Translations

juggernaut

[ˈdʒʌgənɔːt] N
1. (Brit) (= lorry) → camión m de gran tonelaje
2. (fig) (= large and powerful entity) → monstruo m
the group became a sales juggernautel grupo se convirtió en un monstruo en ventas
the juggernaut of tradition/religionla fuerza irresistible de la tradición/religión

juggernaut

[ˈdʒʌgərnɔːt] n (British) (= large truck) → gros poids m lourd

juggernaut

n
(Brit: = lorry) → Schwerlaster m
(Rel) JuggernautDschagannath m, → Jagannath m
(fig: = destructive force) → verheerende Gewalt; a media juggernautein Medienkonglomerat nt; the military juggernautder Militärapparat; the juggernaut of British governmentdie unaufhaltsame britische Regierungsmaschinerie; Puritanism, like some huge juggernaut, swept across the countryder Puritanismus rollte mit unaufhaltsamer Gewalt über das Land

juggernaut

[ˈdʒʌgəˌnɔːt] n (Brit) (lorry) → bisonte m della strada
References in periodicals archive ?
A source in the taxation department said that the new system was going to be introduced to facilitate the buyers and to save them from the juggernaught of touts and corrupt taxation officials.
Asia - The world's second largest economy China posted better than expected GDP growth on Monday with the juggernaught economy increasing in size by 7.
Now juggernaught trucks thunder through, And the motorway's incessant roar Drowns all the natural noises.
Wounded by Ronald Zubar's late, late gaffe at Bolton Mick McCarthy's men were given little hope of halting the United juggernaught which was moving inexorably towards another league title.
However, any evidence of the green shoots of recovery is in danger of being flattened by a red juggernaught which has just clicked into top gear.
The Juggernaught, also from South Africa, combine classic rock, southern metal, blues and rock 'n roll into a single form they call "Man-Rock.
Why don't we work towards assembling our own media juggernaught to support our ideas and aspirations?
The juggernaught overturned along the Rathgael Road in Bangor, Co Down.
That letter illustrates the current debate over outsourcing, which is destined to grow and is a key element in today's globalization juggernaught.