Jugoslav


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Jugoslav

(ˈjuːɡəʊˌslɑːv) or

Jugoslavian

adj, n
1. (Placename) a variant spelling of Yugoslav, Yugoslavian
2. (Peoples) a variant spelling of Yugoslav, Yugoslavian

Yu•go•slav

or Ju•go•slav

(ˈyu goʊˌslɑv, -ˌslæv)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Yugoslavia.
2. any member of a South Slavic–speaking people.
[1850–55; < German Jugoslawe < Serbo-Croatian Jugoslòvēn, Jugoslàvēn=jȕg south + Slovēn, Slavēn Slav]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jugoslav - a native or inhabitant of YugoslaviaJugoslav - a native or inhabitant of Yugoslavia
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Jugoslavija, Serbia and Montenegro, Union of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslavia - a mountainous republic in southeastern Europe bordering on the Adriatic Sea; formed from two of the six republics that made up Yugoslavia until 1992; Serbia and Montenegro were known as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 2003 when they adopted the name of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Translations

Jugoslav

[ˈjuːgəʊˈslɑːv]
A. ADJyugoslavo
B. Nyugoslavo/a m/f

Jugoslav

[ˈjuːgəʊslɑːv]
adjyougoslave
nYougoslave mf

Jugoslav

adjjugoslawisch
nJugoslawe m, → Jugoslawin f
References in periodicals archive ?
Bubna, Executive Assistant in Charge of Federal Relations," Folder 8, Correspondence, 1929-1938, Container 1, CCG Collection; The American Colonial Garden Plan, August 17, 1937, Folder 1, The American Colonial Gardens, Container 4, CCG Collection; "Memorandum to the City Plan Commission Regarding Plans for the Jugoslav Garden," March 24, 1933, Folder 8, Correspondence, 1929-1938, Container 1, CCG Collection; A Perspective of the Proposed Plan, The Slovak Cultural Garden, n.
A Dalmatian Croat and a Catholic, he later repented of his youthful identification with aggressive South Slav nationalism and became dismayed by Serbian domination within the Jugoslav federation.
Voir l'article << Communist Burial of Jugoslav is Protested ", NN, 18 decembre 1934, 8.
Spokesman Jugoslav Milenkovik explains that the constitutional judges must act from a legal and formal aspect but they cannot close their eyes and not take the political events in the review of the concrete cases into consideration.
Monsignor Rytig was a rather glum and abrupt character, a mildly liberal Jugoslav who was certainly hoeing a dry and barren furrow.