Julian calendar


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Related to Julian calendar: Gregorian calendar, Julian date

Julian calendar

n.
The solar calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in Rome in 46 bc, having a year of 12 months and 365 days and a leap year of 366 days every fourth year. It was eventually replaced by the Gregorian calendar. See Table at calendar.

Julian calendar

n
(Historical Terms) the calendar introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 bc, identical to the present calendar in all but two aspects: the beginning of the year was not fixed on Jan 1 and leap years occurred every fourth year and in every centenary year. Compare Gregorian calendar

Jul′ian cal′endar


n.
the calendar established by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C., fixing the length of the year at 365 days and at 366 days every fourth year. There are 12 months of 30 or 31 days, except for February, which has 28 days with the exception of every fourth year, or leap year, when it has 29 days. Compare Gregorian calendar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Julian calendar - the solar calendar introduced in Rome in 46 b.c. by Julius Caesar and slightly modified by Augustus, establishing the 12-month year of 365 days with each 4th year having 366 days and the months having 31 or 30 days except for February
solar calendar - a calendar based on solar cycles
References in periodicals archive ?
1582: Pope Gregory XIII announced the new Gregorian calendar, replacing the Julian calendar.
1582: Pope Gregory XIII announced the new Gregorian calendar, to replace the Julian calendar.
1753 - In Sweden February 17 is followed by March 1 as the country moves from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar.
In the 16th century, Pope Gregory XIII tweaked the Julian calendar, but the month lengths remained the same.
Roman Catholic Christians and other western denominations mark the feast using the Gregorian calendar, Orthodox Christians and most Armenian denominations celebrate the feast using the Julian calendar, while the Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem marks Christmas and Epiphany together on January 19.
The tradition originates in the 1700s, when the people of Wales used the Julian calendar.
Across Alberta and in several countries, such as Ukraine and Russia, Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas today, following the Julian calendar.
It was believed that the Greek solar year lasted for 365 days, and six hours, according to the Julian calendar, meaning that Christmas celebrations should take place on December 25.
Damascus, SANA- Delegated by President, Bashar al-Assad, Minister of Presidential Affairs, Mansour Azzam, congratulated Armenian Orthodox sect who follows the julian calendar on Christmas.
The Julian Calendar was the calendar established by Julius Cesar and for most in the West was replaced by the Gregorian Calendar in 1582 by Pope Gregory.
However, with the world dominance of the Julian calendar, provided by none other than the ancient imperialist, Julius Caesar, the majority of us will see the date 2018 on our mobile phones, laptops, newspapers, etc.
When the Russian government moved from the Julian calendar - which was two weeks behind the rest of the world - to the Gregorian calendar in 1918, the Russian Orthodox Church refused to change their calendar and still lives by the Julian calendar.