Julius II


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Related to Julius II: Paul III

Ju·lius II

 (jo͞ol′yəs) Originally Giuliano della Rovere. 1443-1513.
Pope (1503-1513) who enlarged the temporal power of the papacy and was active in military campaigns in Europe. He also ordered the construction of Saint Peter's in Rome and commissioned Michelangelo to decorate the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican.

Julius II

(ˈdʒuːljəs; -lɪəs)
n
(Biography) original name Guiliano della Rovere. 1443–1513, pope (1503–13). He completed the restoration of the Papal States to the Church, began the building of St Peter's, Rome (1506), and patronized Michelangelo, Raphael, and Bramante
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Julius II was Giuliano della Rovere, Cardinal of San Pietro ad Vincula, born 1443, died 1513.
Venice, in later times, figured more than once in wars of ambition, till, becoming an object to the other Italian states, Pope Julius II.
It revolves around iconic artist Michelangelo's troubles with Pope Julius II while painting "Sistine Chapel.
The show is as close as we can now get to seeing the massive sculptural tomb of the Medici Pope Julius II in its many aborted iterations; it was this"urgent" commission (years before Julius' death) that pulled Michelangelo off the battle fresco.
In fact, Michelangelo was asked by Pope Julius II to "paint our ceiling for the greater glory of God and as an inspiration and lesson to his people".
POPE Julius II apparently threw his vow of celibacy well and truly out of the window and is said to have taken several mistresses.
Such was the case during Alfonso d'Este's war with Pope Julius II, when Isabella openly supported the Duke of Ferrara, her brother, while Francesco acted as a spy for papal forces (chapters 2 and 6).
Peter's Basilica, Julius II commissioned a horoscope to determine the most auspicious time for laying the stone; it was installed April 18,1506, at 10 a.
The Popes who held office immediately before Julius II were more concerned with family and personal aggrandizement than the strengthening of the Church.
Pope Julius II (1503-13), who had an eye for beauty as well as a vile temper, insisted on hiring Michelangelo to work on the Sistine ceiling.
states that the depiction of Zechariah is a kind of portrait of Pope Julius II, Michelangelo's patron; the portrayal of Jeremiah as deep in thought, with one arm on a knee, may have influenced Rodin's sculpture of a thinker.
The statue turned out to be an ancient Roman depiction of the horrifying death of the mythical Trojan priest Laocoon and his two sons, and on the advice of his art advisers, Pope Julius II immediately purchased it and set it up for display within the Vatican.