Jupiter


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Jupiter

Ju·pi·ter

 (jo͞o′pĭ-tər)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The supreme god, patron of the Roman state and brother and husband of Juno. He came to be identified with the Greek Zeus. Also called Jove.
2. Astronomy The fifth planet from the sun, the largest and most massive in the solar system, having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 11.86 years at a mean distance of 778.6 million kilometers (483.8 million miles), a mean diameter of approximately 143,000 kilometers (89,000 miles), and a mass approximately 320 times that of Earth.

[Latin Iūpiter; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

Jupiter

(ˈdʒuːpɪtə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in Roman tradition) the king and ruler of the Olympian gods. Greek counterpart: Zeus

Jupiter

(ˈdʒuːpɪtə)
n
(Celestial Objects) the largest of the planets and the fifth from the sun. It has 67 satellites and is surrounded by a transient planar ring system consisting of dust particles. Mean distance from sun: 778 million km; period of revolution around sun: 11.86 years; period of axial rotation: 9.83 hours; diameter and mass: 11.2 and 317.9 times that of earth respectively. See Galilean satellite

Ju•pi•ter

(ˈdʒu pɪ tər)

n.
1. the supreme deity of the ancient Romans, associated with the sky and rain: identified with the Greek god Zeus.
2. the planet fifth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 88,729 mi. (142,796 km), a mean distance from the sun of 483.6 million mi. (778.3 million km), a period of revolution of 11.86 years, and at least 14 moons. It is the largest planet in the solar system, encircled by a series of rings similar to but smaller than those of Saturn.

Ju·pi·ter

(jo͞o′pĭ-tər)
The fifth planet from the sun and the largest, with a diameter about 11 times that of Earth. It turns on its axis faster than any other planet in the solar system, taking less than ten hours to complete one rotation. See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jupiter - the largest planet and the 5th from the sunJupiter - the largest planet and the 5th from the sun; has many satellites and is one of the brightest objects in the night sky
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
2.Jupiter - (Roman mythology) supreme god of Romans; counterpart of Greek Zeus
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
Translations
Jupiter
Jupiter
JupiterJuppiter
Jupiter
Jupiter
Jupiter
Júpíter
Iuppiter
Jupiteris
JowiszJupiter
Jupiter
Jupiter
Jupiter
ErendizJüpiter

Jupiter

[ˈdʒuːpɪtəʳ] NJúpiter m

Jupiter

[ˈdʒuːpɪtər] n (= planet) → Jupiter f

Jupiter

nJupiter m

Jupiter

[ˈdʒuːpɪtəʳ] n (Myth, Astron) → Giove m
References in classic literature ?
In these excursions he was usually accompanied by an old negro, called Jupiter, who had been manumitted before the reverses of the family, but who could be induced, neither by threats nor by promises, to abandon what he considered his right of attendance upon the footsteps of his young "Massa Will.
Jupiter, grinning from ear to ear, bustled about to prepare some marsh-hens for supper.
Jupiter opened it, and a large Newfoundland, belonging to Legrand, rushed in, leaped upon my shoulders, and loaded me with caresses; for I had shown him much attention during previous visits.
It was about a month after this (and during the interval I had seen nothing of Legrand) when I received a visit, at Charleston, from his man, Jupiter.
Poor Jupiter, haggard, frightened, pale beneath his rouge, dropped his thunderbolt, took his cap in his hand; then he bowed and trembled and stammered: "His eminence--the ambassadors--Madame Marguerite of Flanders--.
The hand clapping was deafening, and Jupiter had already withdrawn under his tapestry, while the hall still trembled with acclamations.
Our readers have been able to observe, that a certain amount of time must have already elapsed from the moment when Jupiter had retired beneath the tapestry to the instant when the author of the new morality had thus abruptly revealed himself to the innocent admiration of Gisquette and Liénarde.
Two neighbours came before Jupiter and prayed him to grant their hearts' desire.
The ancient times, do set forth in figure, both the incorporation, and inseparable conjunction, of counsel with kings, and the wise and politic use of counsel by kings: the one, in that they say Jupiter did marry Metis, which signifieth counsel; whereby they intend that Sovereignty, is married to Counsel: the other in that which followeth, which was thus: They say, after Jupiter was married to Metis, she conceived by him, and was with child, but Jupiter suffered her not to stay, till she brought forth, but eat her up; whereby he became himself with child, and was delivered of Pallas armed, out of his head.
Dost thou not know, thou miserable little licentiate, that I can do it, being, as I say, Jupiter the Thunderer, who hold in my hands the fiery bolts with which I am able and am wont to threaten and lay waste the world?
Those present stood listening to the words and exclamations of the madman; but our licentiate, turning to the chaplain and seizing him by the hands, said to him, 'Be not uneasy, senor; attach no importance to what this madman has said; for if he is Jupiter and will not send rain, I, who am Neptune, the father and god of the waters, will rain as often as it pleases me and may be needful.
And so I will stay where I am, as the chaplain does not take me away; and if Jupiter, as the barber has told us, will not send rain, here am I, and I will rain when I please.