Justin Martyr


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Justin Martyr

(ˈdʒʌstɪn)
n
(Biography) Saint. ?100–?165 ad, Christian apologist and philosopher. Feast day: June 1
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In "The First Apology," second-century saint Justin Martyr writes of how the community would come together on Sundays to read "the memoirs of the apostles or the writings of the prophets .
These primary sources include the writings of Tertullian, Justin Martyr, Josephus Flavius, Suetonius, and Bernard of Cluny.
And there is some evidence in the writings of Justin Martyr (circa A.
In a mere five-page stretch, for example, Wagner and Briggs introduce the reader to Plato's disciple Xenophon, the ancient Christian Justin Martyr, the mathematicians Archytas and Eudoxos, the philosopher Simplicius, and the writer Sosigenes.
Randall Chestnutt shows that Justin Martyr had a rather highly developed understanding of the Watchers tradition, which even influenced the formulation of his Logos theology.
Then he profiles 13 key figures in the tradition, beginning with Justin Martyr and including Peter Abelard, Elizabeth I, Hannah Barnard, and Frederick Temple.
Ancient saints such as Justin Martyr and Clement of Alexandria, and the historian Eusebius of Caesarea, established broad horizons for the Church's symbols, believing that "Since their God is the Lord of all history .
Providing nuanced readings of passages from Clement, Origen, Justin Martyr and, more extensively, the Infancy Gospel of Thomas, which highlight Jesus' or the apostles' lack of formal education, Perkins shows how Christian fiction can "destabilize the contemporary correlation between power and education" (p.
Instead, he ranges more widely, citing passages from Athenagoras, Justin Martyr, and the Epistle to Diognetus, which describe the life of the Christian community whose members are shaped by the dominical sayings to love the enemy; so, for example, unlike Helgeland, he includes Athenagoras (Legatio, 35.
Beginning with The Revised Standard Version in 1952, followed by The Jerusalem Bible in 1966, The New English Bible in 1970, The New Jerusalem Bible in 1985, The Revised English Bible, The Good News Bible and The New Revised Standard Version in 1989, and, just recently, The New American Bible Revised Edition (2011), translators have decided that the time is right to reveal that Aquila, Theodotion, and Symmachus--Jewish and Judaeo-Christian translators of the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek in the second century--were right in translating almah in Isaiah 7:14b as neanis ("young woman") rather than parthenos ("virgin"), and that Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, and Tertullian, who opposed the use of "young woman", were wrong.
IN THE WRITINGS of the apologists such as Justin Martyr and Athenagoras, the same thing is found.
The baker and his wife are a mismatched couple who sound like an inversion of the couple mentioned by Justin Martyr in his Second Apology, where a pagan wife, intemperate like her husband, causes a conflict by converting to Christianity.