Corpus Juris Civilis

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Corpus Juris Civilis

(sɪˈvaɪlɪs)
n
(Law) law the body of Roman or civil law consolidated by Justinian in the 6th century ad. It consists of four parts, the Institutes, Digest, Code, and Novels
[New Latin, literally: body of civil law]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Justinian Code, or Codex, is one of the four parts of the Corpus Iuris Civilis, which is sometimes confusingly referred to in its entirety as the Code of Justinian or--even more confusingly Justinian's Code.
113) The glossators studied historical as well as contemporary texts adding gloss to the canon law, Justinian's code, and the digests of the Roman law.
17) Justinian's code made a similar proclamation in the Institutes, that "by natural law, the following things are free to all men, namely: air, running water, the sea, and for this reason the shores of the sea.
31] A similar conception of sapientia was also a hallmark of the medieval and Renaissance legal tradition; medieval jurists, harking back to Justinian's Code, defined law (lex) as the knowledge of things both human and divine.