corchorus

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Related to Jute Mallow: Corchorus olitorius, Corchorus capsularis
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Noun1.Corchorus - any of various plants of the genus Corchorus having large leaves and cymose clusters of yellow flowerscorchorus - any of various plants of the genus Corchorus having large leaves and cymose clusters of yellow flowers; a source of jute
genus Corchorus, Corchorus - widely distributed genus of tropical herbs or subshrubs; especially Asia
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
2.Corchorus - widely distributed genus of tropical herbs or subshrubs; especially Asia
dilleniid dicot genus - genus of more or less advanced dicotyledonous trees and shrubs and herbs
family Tiliaceae, linden family, Tiliaceae - chiefly trees and shrubs of tropical and temperate regions of especially southeastern Asia and Brazil; genera Tilia, Corchorus, Entelea, Grewia, Sparmannia
corchorus - any of various plants of the genus Corchorus having large leaves and cymose clusters of yellow flowers; a source of jute
References in periodicals archive ?
Jute mallow is an important source of nutrients, income and traditional medicine in Kenya.
Key words: jute mallow, seed vigour, seed viability, storage methods, Corchorusolitorius
IVs include sweet potato (camote), taro ( gabi), cassava, black nightshade (amti), amaranth (kalunay), chayote, edible fern (pako), beggartick (puriket), spinach, water cress, Ceylon spinach (alugbati ), water cabbage (kangkong), waterleaf (talinum), wild cherry tomato, winged bean (sigarilyas/pallang), jute mallow (saluyot), horseradish leaves and pods, sesbania (katuray), among others.
The following vegetables were the most grown along the urban-rural continuum in and around Tamale; okra (Abelmoschus esculentus), pepper (Capsicum spp), roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa), jute mallow (Corchorus olitorius), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), egusi (Citrullus colocynthis), amaranth (Amaranthus spp.
Amaranth, jute mallow, tomato and egusi were on the top of being grown as cash crops compared to other crops, with many households growing them and selling more than 50% of the crop (Table 1).
Nightshade (Solanum scabrum), amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) and Jute mallow (Corchorus olitorius) are the three most grown vegetables in the peri-urban area of Yaounde.
Of the major vegetable species produced in the inland valleys, the seeds of nightshade and Jute mallow are affected the most by the problems of low germination and non-uniformity (Fig.
By ethnic group, nightshade was the second most preferred indigenous vegetable for the Bantu and Semi Bantu, while amaranth and jute mallow were the second most preferred indigenous vegetables for the Sudanese (Table 3).
This study shows the Semi Bantu do not consume much jute mallow, while this vegetable is one of the top species preferred by Sudanese and Bantu.
Figure 1 below shows that the most popular indigenous vegetable was cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata) where more than 23% of the stalls had it displayed for sale; this was followed by Jute mallow (Corchorus olitorius) (11.
0 % of the households and was closely followed by jute mallow (63.
Food considered for analysis were kales (Brasica oleracea var acephala), cowpea leaves (Vigna unguiculata), African vegetable nightshade (Solanum spp), pumpkin leaves (Cucurbita maxima), jute mallow (Corchorus olitorius), Spider plant (Cleome gynadra), slenderleaf (Crotalarias ochroleuca), amaranths (Amaruthus lividus), orange-fleshed sweet potatoe (Ipomea butatus) and Ethiopian kales (Brassica carinata).