Jutish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Jutish: jocular, Eudoses

jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
1. Either of two Asian plants (Corchorus capsularis or C. olitorius) yielding a fiber used for sacking and cordage.
2. The fiber obtained from these plants.

[Bengali jhuṭo, from Sanskrit jūṭaḥ, twisted hair, probably of Dravidian origin.]

Jute

 (jo͞ot)
n.
A member of a Germanic people who invaded Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries ad and settled in the south and southeast and on the Isle of Wight.

[From Middle English Jutes, the Jutes, from Medieval Latin Iutae, from Old English Iotas, Iutan; akin to Old English Gēat, Geat.]

Jute, Jut′ish adj.

Jutish

(ˈdʒuːtɪʃ)
adj
1. (Languages) of or relating to the Jutes
2. (Peoples) of or relating to the Jutes
n
3. (Languages) another name for Kentish
4. (Peoples) another name for Kentish
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jutish - one of the major dialects of Old English
Old English, Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
References in periodicals archive ?
Harald Wolbersen ("The decline of the South Jutish in Angeln: a historical case of transformation into the modem age around 1800") se concentra en la descripcion del juto meridional hablado en Angeln (Anglia), al sureste del ducado de Schleswig.
Which legendary brothers led the first Jutish settlers to come to Britain in the fifth century?
Even the very name, Hamlet, constitutes controversy in itself, occurring from 10th century Jutish Amlethoe, then as Amlethus of Saxo.