Kabardian


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Kabardian

(kəˈbɑːdɪən)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a Circassian people of the North West Caucasus
2. (Languages) the Eastern dialect of the Circassian language. Compare Adygei
References in periodicals archive ?
Other languages of the sample do not employ this word-formation processes in a significant way, with the exception of the North-Caucasian language Kabardian that makes use of it for the formation of nouns and adjectives.
He thinks that the failure of the "Soviet project to create a separate Adighe, Kabardian and Cherkess identity," "ethnic solidarity of the Circassians in the 14th and 15th century Mamluk Empire," and "survival of Circassian ethnic identity in various Circassian diasporas since the 1860s, despite subjection to the nationalizing policies of the states in which they found themselves" demonstrate that the ethno-symbolist theory of nation explains the Circassian case better (p.
Farther east, we know that Fort Mozdok on the Terek River was built at the request of a Kabardian prince seeking protection against his neighbors; there are other examples in Siberia of local leaders inviting the Russian to build outposts for the same reason.
the Kabardian hobby school had 2 students in 2008 and 27 in 2011 (in 2000, 14 Kabardians lived in Estonia), and the Narva Uzbek Sunday School had 7 and 26 students, respectively.
The official Soviet bureaucracy defined them as Adyghean, Cherkess, Kabardian and Shapsough depending on their place of residence and the dialect of the Circassian language spoken.
This is the case in Kabardian (7) where the declarative -s found in (7a) is absent in the PI (7b).
It attempts to show the relevance of Kabardian data to the theoretical issues of the status of independent NPs in head-marking languages, and the universal domain of case assignment.
According to Hawkins (1983: 119) the pattern [dem N A num] is also found in Kabardian and Warao and the pattern [N A num dem] in Selepet and Yoruba, although it remains to be seen if we are really dealing with simple, integral NPs here.
According to Voroshilov, who described his impressions in a letter to Stalin on 21 January 1923, the "Chechens were no better or worse than other mountaineers [gortsy]," yet they had more "mullahs, sheikhs, and other devilry [chertovshchina] than others--for example, the Karachai and even the Kabardian peoples," and their "fanaticism, backwardness, and ignorance [were] extraordinary.
The first essay by LaszloMaracz deals with the expedition to the North Caucasus of Hungarian linguist Count Balint de Szentkatolna (1844-1913) who studied and developed a dictionary for Kabardian and believed that the language was "Turanian" and part of a hypothesized family including Uralic, Altaic and Dravidian languages, a controversial idea.
Kabardian (East Circassian) is an ergative head-marking language spoken in the Caucasus (NW Caucasian, Adyghe- Kabardian subgroup; ca.