kakiemon


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kakiemon

(ˌkækɪˈeɪmɒn; ˌkɑːkiː-)
n
a Japanese porcelain design credited to Kakiemon Sakaida, first produced in the 17th century and widely collected and imitated in the West
References in periodicals archive ?
Among these are a Japanese porcelain vase and cover decorated in the Kakiemon style (c.
Sakaida Kakiemon I (1596-1666) mastered the techniques of overglaze enamel painting in Arita.
Currently, she is looking at Kakiemon and Imari import ware from the late 1600s and the resulting soft- and hard-paste porcelain European imitations by Burgley House (1688), Hampton Court (1696) and Meissen (1730).
Mantlepieces and shelves of royal palaces and aristocratic stately homes were adorned with Japanese porcelains: blue-and-white wares, Kakiemon, Imari and other designs.
It was the Dutch who encouraged the Japanese to develop a decorative style based on brocade patterns, using mainly a palette of underglaze blue combined with overglaze iron red and gold, rather than the simpler blue and white or kakiemon porcelains that the Japanese themselves preferred.
The others are Nakasaburo Shinnai, 60, a puppet theater samisen player in Tokyo, Minori Yoshita, 68, a gold leaf craftsman in Komatsu, Ishikawa Prefecture, Kuroemon Katayama, 70, a leading Noh actor in Kyoto, Shoin Yamase, 68, a koto player in Tokyo, Kakiemon Sakaida, 66, a porcelain maker in Arita, Saga Prefecture, and Kiyotsugu Nakagawa 58, a woodcraft artist in Kyoto.
Within decades of this discovery, Kakiemon Sakaida began creating porcelain with red, green and yellow designs.
Included in the collection of 20,000 pieces are porcelain wares from the Ming Dynasty in China and Imari and Kakiemon wares from Japan.
This is because it's actually copying another style of Japanese porcelain known as Kakiemon, a style which, like
Of the 21 artists in this exhibition, four are deceased, including Sakaida Kakiemon XIV, born in 1934, who has been designated a Living National Treasure; Fukumoto Fuku (b 1973) together with Kitamura Junko (b 1956), are the only females and Wada Akira (b 1978) is the youngest at 35.
These early porcelains were often simple blue and white pieces or decorated in a restrained style in the Japanese taste referred to as kakiemon.
Highlights on show with the 15 participating galleries include a superb krater vase from the collection of Sir William Hamilton with Daniela Kumpf; a slender Chelsea Vase painted in the Kakiemon palette, 1745-49, with Brian Haughton Gallery, and an imposing porcelain bust of Mirabeau (Fig.