kettledrum

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Related to Kettledrums: tympani

ket·tle·drum

 (kĕt′l-drŭm′)
n.
A large hemispherical drum, often made of copper or brass with a parchment head.

kettledrum

(ˈkɛtəlˌdrʌm)
n
(Instruments) a percussion instrument of definite pitch, consisting of a hollow bowl-like hemisphere covered with a skin or membrane, supported on a tripod or stand. The pitch may be adjusted by means of screws or pedals, which alter the tension of the skin
ˈkettleˌdrummer n

ket•tle•drum

(ˈkɛt lˌdrʌm)

n.
a drum consisting of a hollow hemisphere of brass, copper, or fiberglass over which is stretched a skin, the tension of which can be modified by screws or foot pedals to vary the pitch. Compare timpani.
[1595–1605]
ket′tle•drum`mer, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kettledrum - a large hemispherical brass or copper percussion instrument with a drumhead that can be tuned by adjusting the tension on itkettledrum - a large hemispherical brass or copper percussion instrument with a drumhead that can be tuned by adjusting the tension on it
percussion instrument, percussive instrument - a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by one object striking another
Translations
طَبْل نُحاسي
pauke
üstdob
páka, ketiltrumba
tympan

kettledrum

[ˈketldrʌm] Ntimbal m

kettledrum

[ˈkɛtəldrʌm] ntimbale f

kettledrum

n(Kessel)pauke f

kettledrum

[ˈkɛtlˌdrʌm] ntimpano

kettle

(ˈketl) noun
a metal pot, usually with a special part for pouring and a lid, for heating liquids. a kettle full of boiling water.
ˈkettledrum noun
a type of drum made of a brass or copper bowl covered with a stretched skin etc.
References in classic literature ?
Nay, nay," said Don Quixote at this; "on that point of the bells Master Pedro is very inaccurate, for bells are not in use among the Moors; only kettledrums, and a kind of small trumpet somewhat like our clarion; to ring bells this way in Sansuena is unquestionably a great absurdity.
Must one clatter like kettledrums and penitential preachers?
The Queen of Denmark, a very buxom lady, though no doubt historically brazen, was considered by the public to have too much brass about her; her chin being attached to her diadem by a broad band of that metal (as if she had a gorgeous toothache), her waist being encircled by another, and each of her arms by another, so that she was openly mentioned as "the kettledrum.
These bronze kettledrums have been found scattered from southern China to the coast of Papua, and their manufacture may have begun sometime between about 600 to 300 BCE in the workshops of northern Vietnam.
Kettledrums are the main focus of the entry, and de Pontigny's vague reference to "the East" fits with what we know about their adoption into European music.
The tassa in fact refers to a small ensemble of one or two medium-sized kettledrums, traditionally made from a clay shell (now lightweight metal) with a goatskin head (now a synthetic material).
heels to the sound of the big kettledrums in the orchestra.
Ivory and bronze kettledrums as trade commodities can be traced far back in time to very early civilizations.
The most distinctive pre-"Indianization" objects found in the region from at least the 5th century BCE are the bronze kettledrums, commonly known as Dong Son drums (figure 4), which depict birds, boats, feathered people and dancing figures.
4) The publication of "March for Strings, Kettledrums, and Sixty-three Dwarfs" in the "Bibliography of Poem Sources" (470) seems absurd, based on a mis-use of the word "stanza.
after all, being married, we might as well be friends too--but no, no answer, he just squinted, this was how he demonstrated disapproval, for him it amounted to an angry gesture, and all that just because I was late due to the snowstorm, everything is buried under the snow, but of course he doesn't know where I came from, how slowly we crawled ahead on the highway, with no visibility, snowflakes weaving lunatic blankets in the air, aha, the kettledrums were late by a fraction of a second, but the oboe saved the day nonetheless, and the car almost got stuck, and it was awfully slippery everywhere .
That would explain the beggar quoting Ovid, the kettledrums, and