killer cell

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killer cell

n.
Any of various lymphocytes, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, that kill infected or malignant cells.

killer cell

n
(Pathology) a type of white blood cell that is able to kill cells, such as cancer cells and cells infected with viruses

kill′er cell`


n.
any of several types of lymphocyte or leukocyte capable of destroying cells that have acquired foreign characteristics.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.killer cell - T cell with CD8 receptor that recognizes antigens on the surface of a virus-infected cell and binds to the infected cell and kill it
T cell, T lymphocyte - a small lymphocyte developed in the thymus; it orchestrates the immune system's response to infected or malignant cells
Translations

killer cell

n. linfocito citolítico o linfocito citocida.
References in periodicals archive ?
ImmunoMax is a pharmaceutical grade polysaccharide of plant origin that has been demonstrated to stimulate natural killer cells (1).
This, in turn, could improve cancer immunotherapy and shrinktumourss by unleashing antitumour T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.
The first line of defense against virus-infected (28-31) and cancer cells is our natural killer cells.
But scientists at CARE Fertility, finally cracked it on their fifth attempt by drip-feeding the new mum egg yolk and soya oil to fight killer cells that were destroying her chances.
He discovered cancer cells express a molecule, recognised by CD96, which blocks the killer cells from reacting.
I was searching online day after day and found this web page about natural killer cells and was convinced that was me.
Their findings add weight to current research centering on the role of natural killer cells (or NK cells) and the ability of steroids to prevent miscarriage, which scientists had been uncertain about.
T killer cells would therefore represent an important component of yet unavailable vaccines against infections like HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C virus and malaria, and also for the treatment of cancer.
Whether or not you can fight it depends on your body's supply of natural killer cells.
Leanne Blackwell, 38, and husband Andy, 48, spent pounds 15,000 on IVF without any success before doctors told them her body was producing killer cells that were attacking her fertilised eggs.
The test will look for the presence of natural killer cells in the lining of the womb, which recent research has indicated could be a cause of repeat miscarriages.
Dr George Ndukwe prescribed steroids to keep the killer cells in check and then viagra to help the blood flow.