newton

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new·ton

 (no͞ot′n, nyo͞ot′n)
n. Abbr. N
The SI-derived unit of force required to accelerate a mass of one kilogram one meter per second per second, equal to 100,000 dynes. See Table at measurement.

[After Sir Isaac Newton.]

newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of force that imparts an acceleration of 1 metre per second to a mass of 1 kilogram; equivalent to 105 dynes or 7.233 poundals. Symbol: N
[C20: named after Sir Isaac Newton]

Newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Astronomy) one of the deepest craters on the moon, over 7300 m deep and about 112 km in diameter, situated in the SE quadrant

Newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Biography) Sir Isaac. 1642–1727, English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, and philosopher, noted particularly for his law of gravitation, his three laws of motion, his theory that light is composed of corpuscles, and his development of calculus independently of Leibnitz. His works include Principia Mathematica (1687) and Opticks (1704)

new•ton

(ˈnut n, ˈnyut n)

n.
the SI unit of force, equal to the force that produces an acceleration of one meter per second per second on a mass of one kilogram.
[1900–05; after I. Newton]

New•ton

(ˈnut n, ˈnyut n)

n.
1. Sir Isaac, 1642–1727, English physicist and mathematician.
2. a city in E Massachusetts, near Boston. 82,230.

new·ton

(no͞ot′n)
A unit used to measure force. One newton is equal to the force needed to accelerate a mass of one kilogram one meter per second per second.

newton

1. The unit of force giving a mass of 1 kg an acceleration of about 1 m per second per second.
2. (N) A unit of force which, when applied, accelerates a mass of one kilogram by one meter per second per second. This unit has replaced the dyne: 1 N = 105 dynes. Named after Isaac Newton (1642–1727).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newton - English mathematician and physicistNewton - English mathematician and physicist; remembered for developing the calculus and for his law of gravitation and his three laws of motion (1642-1727)
2.newton - a unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 m/sec/sec to a mass of 1 kilogram; equal to 100,000 dynes
force unit - a unit of measurement of physical force
dyne - a unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 cm/sec/sec to a mass of 1 gram
sthene - a unit of force equal to 1000 newtons
Translations
njutn
ニュートン
niuton
newton

newton

[ˈnjuːtn] Nnewton m, neutonio m
References in periodicals archive ?
In total, the rocket can generate 22,819 Kilonewtons of thrust, which is approximately equal to eighteen Boeing 747 aircraft ay full power.
It is powered by a 310-kilowatt (kW) (422-horsepower) 8-cylinder V-engine that provides a drawbar pull, or pushing force, of 694 kilonewtons (156,017 pounds).
Scalable building-block approaches to automation allow systems to be supplied from very low-force applications (just a few newtons) to very high-force applications of a thousand kilonewtons or more.
The products covered have a tensile strength of greater than 5 kilonewtons per meter (kN/m) according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method D6637/D6637M in any direction and average overall flexural stiffness of more than 100,000 milligram-centimeter according to the ASTM D7748/D7748M Standard Test Method for Flexural Rigidity of Geogrids, Geotextiles and Related Products, or other equivalent test method standards.
The present RTSS camera systems have been used in a number of two- and four-post test frames, ranging from 50-1,800n kilonewtons (kN) capacity to test specimens of varying length and cross-section with cyclic strain cycles of up to 3.