kiore


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kiore

(ˈkiːɒrɛ)
n, pl kiore
(Animals) another name for Māori rat
[Māori]
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Home ranges and interactions of kiore (Rattus exulans) and Norway rats (R.
Wetapunga numbers were originally thought to be declining on Little Barrier Island (Gibbs & McIntyre 1997), but are now slowly increasing following the eradication of kiore (Rattus exulans) in 2004 (C) Green, unpublished data).
This tree weta roosted closer to and was more active on the ground on Nukuwaiata Island 4 years after kiore (Rattus exulans) were eradicated from the island.
The very rat they have brought over seas drives away our kiore [the native rat] and we see him no more.
Landcare Research (3 June 2008) Kiore Provides New Insights into New Zealand's Initial Colonisation, www.
Response of lizard assemblages in the Mercury Islands, New Zealand, to removal of an introduced rodent: the kiore (Rattus exulans).
But perhaps a greater scourge on the local fauna came in the form of an animal the Maori accidentally brought with them--the Pacific rat or Kiore, which quickly devastated bird populations, as well as those of the tuatara, an unusual primitive lizard-like reptile that is now extinct on the mainland.
Holdaway and Worthy say that humans and the introduced kiore, or Pacific rat, caused the rapid extinction of most of the large and small bird species on the island nation, making up three separate waves of extinction.
The Polynesian rat, or Kiore, were bought to New Zealand from Polynesia by early Maori settlers more than 1,000 years ago as a food source.
Smaller species such as the storm petrels and diving petrel(s) would undoubtedly have disappeared sooner but after the introduction of kiore about 2000 years BP (Holdaway 1996).
In her evocation of both mystical and practical elements which bridge past and present, a bright flow of dialogue mimetically reproduced the excursionary exploits of a little Taniwha and a Mexican kiore - swept along together on El Nino, the tempestuous current with its multicultural associations.
Wetapunga numbers were thought to be declining (Gibbs & McIntyre 1997), but are now slowly increasing following the eradication of kiore (Rattus exulans) in 2004 (Green et al.