Kirghiz


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Kirghiz: Kirghiz Steppe, Kirghiz Range

Kir·ghiz

 (kîr-gēz′)
adj. & n.
Variant of Kyrgyz.

Kirghiz

(ˈkɜːɡɪz) or

Kirgiz

n
1. (Peoples) a variant spelling of Kyrgyz
2. (Languages) a variant spelling of Kyrgyz

Kir•ghiz

or Kir•giz

(kɪrˈgiz)

n., pl. -ghiz•es or -giz•es, (esp. collectively) -ghiz or -giz.
1. a member of a Turkic people of Central Asia, living mainly in Kirghizia, Tadzhikistan, and the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region in W China.
2. the language of the Kirghiz.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Kirghiz - a member of a people of Turkic speech and Mongolian race inhabiting vast regions of central SiberiaKirghiz - a member of a people of Turkic speech and Mongolian race inhabiting vast regions of central Siberia
Turki - any member of the peoples speaking a Turkic language
2.Kirghiz - a landlocked republic in west central Asia bordering on northwestern ChinaKirghiz - a landlocked republic in west central Asia bordering on northwestern China; formerly an Asian soviet but became independent in 1991
CIS, Commonwealth of Independent States - an alliance made up of states that had been Soviet Socialist Republics in the Soviet Union prior to its dissolution in Dec 1991
Bishkek, Biskek, capital of Kyrgyzstan, Frunze - the capital of Kyrgyzstan (known as Frunze 1926-1991)
Asia - the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations
Pamir Mountains, the Pamirs - a mountain range in central Asia that is centered in Tajikistan but extends into Kyrgyzstan and Afghanistan and Pakistan and western China
3.Kirghiz - the Turkic language spoken by the Kirghiz
Turkic, Turkic language, Turko-Tatar, Turki - a subfamily of Altaic languages
Translations
References in classic literature ?
A little behind, on a poor, small, lean Kirghiz mount with an enormous tail and mane and a bleeding mouth, rode a young officer in a blue French overcoat.
And turning to his men he directed a party to go on to the halting place arranged near the watchman's hut in the forest, and told the officer on the Kirghiz horse (who performed the duties of an adjutant) to go and find out where Dolokhov was and whether he would come that evening.
Similarly the Kirghiz commemorated the epic of their Manas following the change of regime.
Elsewhere in the same text we read of the Kirghiz, whose men tattoo the hands as a mark of valor, and whose women tattoo the nape of the neck as a sign of marital status.
Headed by Argentinean helmer Fernando Solanas, jury for fest will consist of Italian director Florestano Vanchini, Georgia's Lana Gogoberidze, Kirghiz Tolomush Okeev, Spain's Antonio Jimenez-Rico and local hero Valery Todorovsky, as well as American cameraman Adam Greenberg and Iranian critic Shala Nakhid.
42% of the Kyrgyz died during the civil commotion, its suppression and further move of the people to China, according to the Great Encyclopedia of the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic of 1979.
81) Azeri, Armenian, Belorussian, Estonian, Georgian, Jewish, Kirghiz, Lettish, Lithuanian, Polish, Ukrainian, Tatar, and Finnish representatives met at this congress.
840, the victorious Kirghiz followed Inner Asian political tradition and established an empire that included the Mongolian plateau, particularly the Orkhon River valley--the traditional "heartland" of many earlier pastoral empires, including that of the defeated Uighurs.
This theme is also found in Central Asia, where the snake appears in the form of a whip, one of the attributes of Kirghiz shamaness, who is referred to as "open eyes.
They inhabit in Terskey Ala-Too, Talas Ala-Too, Kashkl-Too, as well as in the ranges of Chatkalskiy, Kirghiz, Ferghana, and Alai.
9 English Kyrgyzstan 76,641 35 Bishkek Kirghiz, 5,200,000 1.
The weakness or nonexistence of social struggle in Magnitogorsk had multiple causes: the absence of trade unions worthy of the name; the difficulties of daily life where the fight to procure food, clothing, and housing absorbed considerable time and energy; and adding to this, the racism of Russians toward other ethnic groups (Bashkirs, Kirghiz, etc.