Knole


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Knole

(nəʊl)
n
(Named Buildings) a mansion in Sevenoaks in Kent: built (1454) for Thomas Bourchier, Archbishop of Canterbury; later granted to the Sackville family, who made major alterations (1603–08)
References in periodicals archive ?
This included helping to fund big projects such as finishing the 30-year restoration and conservation of Kedleston Hall in Derbyshire, the continuing restoration of Knole in Kent and repairing the roof at The Vyne in Hampshire; plus restoring the famous gardens at Stowe in Buckinghamshire and Standen in West Sussex.
From a Zanzibar Sultan to an Oriental princess In April 1817, a young woman, wearing a turban and strange oriental dress, was found wandering in the grounds of Knole Park, a large house in Gloucestershire.
The National Trust has replicated the series of photographs three decades on at some of the most severely hit places - Emmetts, Chartwell and Knole, in Kent.
Lower Grangetown came first - Clive Street, Holmesdale Street, Kent Street, Worcester St, Amherst, Bromsgrove, Knole, Sevenoaks and Hewell Street - all established by 1880.
The whole family can enjoy this walk exploring the wildlife of Knole House, Kent's only deer park, which has hardly changed since medieval times.
Cleveland Police is investigating after the Knole Road incident yesterday afternoon, in which a 25-year-old was injured.
When Lionel Sackville-West's only brother died without heirs, Lionel became the sole inheritor of Knole, one of the grandest historical houses in England.
Given the relatively short nature of the monograph, she manages to mention a healthy percentage of houses by name; having grown up in the labyrinthine Knole in Kent, she was intimately acquainted with many of the places she describes.
Ostensibly it is a fascinating tale of seven generations of women, including Vita Sackville-West, friend and lover of Virginia Woolf and the famous houses in which they intermittently lived: Knole, the calendar house, with its 365 rooms and 52 staircases and Sissinghurst with its celebrated gardens.
is affirmed by the final exclamation, as well as her evocation of the garter in the hall and the leopards, which according to Sackville-West's Knole and the Sackvilles (1922) can be found at Sackville-West's ancestral home, Knole (2-3, 29).
This possibility immediately calls to mind the best-known staircase in Kent, at Knole, which is one of the finest Jacobean staircases in the country: its structure is painted in imitation of expensive stone and marble.
In December, he entered the prestigious Junior Knole Run, a 2.