knowingness


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know·ing

 (nō′ĭng)
adj.
1. Possessing knowledge, information, or understanding: very knowing about transportation costs.
2. Showing clever awareness and resourcefulness; shrewd and worldly: "Even so knowing a young ruffian as William Chaloner would have had no preparation for the shock of London" (Thomas Levenson).
3. Suggestive of secret or private knowledge: a knowing glance.
4. Deliberate; conscious: a knowing attempt to defraud.
5. Archaic Fashionable; stylish: "Many young men ... drove about town in very knowing gigs" (Jane Austen).

know′ing·ly adv.
know′ing·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knowingness - having knowledge of; "he had no awareness of his mistakes"; "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"; "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"
self-awareness - awareness of your own individuality
feel - an intuitive awareness; "he has a feel for animals" or "it's easy when you get the feel of it";
sense - a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self"
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
2.knowingness - shrewdness demonstrated by knowledge
astuteness, perspicaciousness, perspicacity, shrewdness - intelligence manifested by being astute (as in business dealings)
References in classic literature ?
He possessed a dim, vague, imperative knowingness that it was not merely not good, but supremely disastrous, leading to the mistily glimpsed sense of utter endingness for a dog, for any dog, to go into the water where slipped and slid and noiselessly paddled, sometimes on top, sometimes emerging from the depths, great scaly monsters, huge-jawed and horribly-toothed, that snapped down and engulfed a dog in an instant just as the fowls of Mister Haggin snapped and engulfed grains of corn.
Such qualities in an inferior, who could always be treated with authority in spite of his superior knowingness, had necessarily a fatal fascination for Tom; and every holiday-time Maggie was sure to have days of grief because he had gone off with Bob.
If some parts of his conduct made Captain Dobbin exceedingly grave and cool; of what use was it to tell George that, though his whiskers were large, and his own opinion of his knowingness great, he was as green as a schoolboy?
Casson, the landlord of the Donnithorne Arms, in his most striking attitude--that is to say, with the forefinger of his right hand thrust between the buttons of his waistcoat, his left hand in his breeches pocket, and his head very much on one side; looking, on the whole, like an actor who has only a mono-syllabic part entrusted to him, but feels sure that the audience discern his fitness for the leading business; curiously in contrast with old Jonathan Burge, who held his hands behind him and leaned forward, coughing asthmatically, with an inward scorn of all knowingness that could not be turned into cash.
The grossest ignorance does not disgust like this impudent knowingness.
People say these letters in whispers to communicate a knowingness that wishes to be spared the burden of explaining.
The hair, which came in wild colors, was their most defining feature, yet what really made the Troll doll special is that it seemed to be beaming, with an innocent mysterioso knowingness.
Cowie deftly uses these theoretical approaches to face head on the complexities of reality, our knowingness of that reality, and our desires for that knowingness represented in that reality.
That mix of rural innocence and urban knowingness, an attention to detail with a sense of the larger emotional meaning, is what give the film much of its power.
This is a situation those of us who teach literature at schools or universities know all too well: in our very knowingness, we have had to become 'system creatures' (p.
This "self-consciously reflexive mode of expression, freighted with expectation and a heightened sense of duty towards Antillean readers" in which "the motif of childhood is developed as a politicized literary conceit" includes "a narrative arc from innocence to knowingness regarding the slave history, a desire to accurately depict the specificities of Antillean life, and a bold awareness of bringing the subaltern to the fore by creating new literary production" (p.
It's a nice read, but all that second-guessing and knowingness is fatiguing, in the end.