Kotzebue Sound


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Kot·ze·bue Sound

 (kŏt′sə-byo͞o′)
An inlet of the Chukchi Sea in northwest Alaska north of Seward Peninsula.
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Kotzebue--known as the Gateway to the Arctic--lies on a sand spit at the end of Baldwin Peninsula in the Kotzebue Sound at the end of the Noatak, Kobuk, and Selawik Rivers, serving as a trading location for Alaska Natives for hundreds of years.
In early to late June, fish were located near the tagging sites (mouth and lower reaches of the Wulik River) and in nearshore areas within or adjacent to Kotzebue Sound (Fig.
Reaching this duck destination is no easy task, but once you arrive a boat ride across the Kotzebue Sound and then up the river will have you on the birds.
The Ipnatchiaq Electric Utility is in Deering, Alaska, on the Kotzebue Sound at the mouth of the Immachuk River, 57 miles southwest of Kotzebue.
In Alaska, meanwhile, melting sea ice and thawing permafrost have allowed winter storms to erode the coastlines of Cape Krusenstem National Monument and the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve in Kotzebue Sound at an unprecedented rate.
1982) from Kotzebue Sound is provided in an unpublished report by Lowry et al.
The shipping season lasts 100 days, from early July to early October, when the Kotzebue Sound is ice-free.
The first lineage included all populations sampled from Korea, Japan, Russia, the Mackenzie River, Kotzebue Sound, Norton Sound, the Yukon River, and northern and central Bristol Bay.
At Cape Krusenstern National Monument, just across Kotzebue Sound from the town, Native people set up spring camps to kill not only seals but also the eerily beautiful white whales called beluga.
Located on the Buckland River just below the Arctic Circle just a few miles from Eschscholtz Bay connected to Kotzebue Sound, it is the only village for over 60 miles here in northwest Alaska.
The opening of the maritime fur trade at Bering Strait; Americans and Russians meet the Kanjigmiut in Kotzebue Sound.
From the time the Samms arrived in Kotzebue Sound north of the Arctic Circle in 1897, there have been Quakers among the Inuit (Eskimos).